A plan of Success Bay in Strait le Maire. A chart of the S.E. part of Terra del Fuego including Strait le Maire and part of Staten-land


Title:
A plan of Success Bay in Strait le Maire. A chart of the S.E. part of Terra del Fuego including Strait le Maire and part of Staten-land
Date:
C1773
Mapmaker:
James Cook (1728-1779)
Engraver:
Thomas Bowen (1733?-1790)
Image Size:
305mm x 360mm (12.01" x 14.17")
Sheet Size:
400mm x 435mm (15.75" x 17.13")
Condition:
Expertly remargined on right hand side, folds as issued.
Technique:
Copper engraving.
Price:

Availability: In stock

$A 250
Stock Number:
CK01E 2039 SAM ARG (NAG) (F49)
Description:

Rare engraving from the official British Admiralty sanctioned edition of the accounts of Cook’s first voyage. All other later copies made of this image by other publishers were unauthorised, usually smaller and inferior in quality.

Cook went ashore at Tierra del Fuego on 14th January 1769 and noted in his log, 'perhaps as miserable a set of People as are this day upon Earth.' Leaving Tierra del Fuego the Endeavour rounded Cape Horn and sailed into the Pacific Ocean.

Reference: Hakluyt Society 1.41A ill. p.49

From Hawkesworth, An Account of the Voyages Undertaken by the Order of His Present Majesty for Making Discoveries in the Southern Hemisphere,...

Biography:

James Cook (1728–1779) 

Cook was the most important navigator of the Age of Enlightenment, a period that saw the mystery of the Southland resolved, the discovery of New Zealand, Hawaii, numerous Pacific Islands and confirmation that a Northwest Passage did not exist. 

Cook was born in Yorkshire, England, the son of a Scottish labourer and apprenticeship for three years under John Walker, a Quaker coal-shipper of Whitby. In 1755 Walker offered him a command, but instead Cook joined HMS Eagle and within a month was master's mate. After two years on the Channel service, he was promoted master of the Pembroke, and in 1758 crossed the Atlantic in her and took part in the siege of Louisburg and the survey of the St Lawrence River that led to the capture of Quebec. Returning to England in 1762 he married Elizabeth Batts (1742-1832?) of Shadwell, whom he was to rarely see in the ensuing years at sea.

 

Cook then famously commanded three voyages that ended with his death on the island of Hawaii on 14 February 1779.

Availability: In stock

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Availability: In stock

$A 250
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Free shipping
Australia-wide
Worldwide over $A150