C1790

White Jointed Pider

Artist:

Sarah Stone (1760 - 1844)

Rare engraving from John White’s first fleet Journal. WHITE-JOINTED SPIDER The species of Spiders, unless seen recent, and in the utmost state of perfection, are not easily distinguished. The present species is most remarkable for the lucid surface of its thorax … Read Full Description

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S/N: JOAV-055-ANI-SPI–230403
(DRW06)
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Details

Full Title:

White Jointed Pider

Date:

C1790

Artist:

Sarah Stone (1760 - 1844)

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Copper engraving with original hand colouring

Image Size: 

175mm 
x 225mm
AUTHENTICITY
White Jointed Pider - Antique Print from 1790

Genuine antique
dated:

1790

Description:

Rare engraving from John White’s first fleet Journal.

WHITE-JOINTED SPIDER

The species of Spiders, unless seen recent, and in the utmost state of perfection, are not easily distinguished. The present species is most remarkable for the lucid surface of its thorax and legs, which latter are furnished with several long moveable spines, that may be either elevated or depressed at the will of the animal: this, however, is not peculiar to the present species, but is seen in some others. The eyes are eight in number, and are arranged in the same manner as those of the great American Spider, or Aranea Avicularia of Linnaeus.

The colour of this Spider is a clear chestnut brown, except the body, which is a pale brown, with a very deep or blackish fascia on its upper part, reaching about half-way down. The orifice at the tip of each fang is very visible by so slight a magnifying power as that of a glass of two inches focus: this Spider is therefore of the number of those which poison their prey before they destroy it.

The Plate exhibits the back and front view, of the natural size. A. the order in which the spines are placed. The lesser a. two spines enlarged, shewing the bracket on which they turn, and the groove or niche they shut into when closed. C. the fangs magnified.

Biography:

Sarah Stone (1760-1844)

Known as Sarah Smith or Sarah Stone, she was the daughter of a professional fan painter and worked as a natural history illustrator in England between 1777 and 1820. Like many British artists she never travelled to the Southern Hemisphere, although she is best known for her depictions of Australian subjects.

Stone was commissioned by some of the great eighteenth-century collectors, including Sir Ashton Lever and Sir Joseph Banks, to prepare watercolour drawings based on specimens of animals, birds and objects brought back to England by members of recent voyages of exploration. In many cases her drawings were the first studies of certain natural history species, a fact which makes them of considerable scientific interest. Some of her watercolours recording the collections of artefacts and natural history gathered on the voyages of Captain James Cook are among the treasures of the Australian Museum in Sydney and the Bishop Museum in Honolulu. As Miss Stone, ‘Honorary Exhibitor’, she exhibited four paintings at the Royal Academy in 1781 and 1786: two of birds, a peacock and a group of shells. As Mrs Smith, she showed a perspective view of Sir Ashton Lever’s Museum with the London Society of Artists at Leicester House in 1791 – previously exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1785.  

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