C1773

[A view of Endeavour River, on the coast of New Holland, where the ship was laid on shore in order to repair the damage which she received on the rock.]

The first engraved view of Australia’s east coast printed in 1773, in the official accounts of James Cook’s first voyage and one of only a handful of c.18th images to depict the Endeavour. The Endeavour a converted collier, was chosen … Read Full Description

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Full Title:

[A view of Endeavour River, on the coast of New Holland, where the ship was laid on shore in order to repair the damage which she received on the rock.]

Date:

C1773

Condition:

In good condition, with folds as issued. Wide untrimmed margins

Technique:

Hand coloured copper engraving.

Image Size: 

220mm 
x 480mm

Paper Size: 

528mm 
x 295mm
AUTHENTICITY
[A view of Endeavour River, on the coast of New Holland, where the ship was laid on shore in order to repair the damage which she received on the rock.] - Antique View from 1773

Genuine antique
dated:

1773

Description:

The first engraved view of Australia’s east coast printed in 1773, in the official accounts of James Cook’s first voyage and one of only a handful of c.18th images to depict the Endeavour.

The Endeavour a converted collier, was chosen by Cook because of it’s flat-bottomed design which allowed it to sail in shallow waters and to be beached for loading and unloading. Here it is shown careened for repairs near present day Cooktown. On Cook’s seminal chart of the east coast he gives the name, The Labyrinth,  to the maze of reefs now named the Great Barrier Reef.

Cook’s own account of the Endeavour striking the reef 10 June 1770;

before ten, we had twenty and one twenty fathom, and this depth continuing, the gentlemen left the deck in great tranquillity, and went to bed; but a few minutes before eleven, the water fhallowed at once from twenty to feventeen fathom, and before the lead could be caft again, the fhip ftruck, and remained immoveable, except by the heaving of the furge, that beat her against the craggs of the rock upon which she lay.‘. Cook Journal I, 3, 545-

‘In the morning of the 17th, though the wind was still fresh, we ventured to weigh, and push in for the harbour; but in doing this we twice run the ship aground.. In the morning of Monday the 18th, a stage was made from the ship to the shore, which was so bold that she floated at twenty feet distance.’ Cook, Journals I, 3, 556-7.

‘The next morning we went early to work, and by four o’clock in the afternoon had got out all the coals, cast the moorings loose, and warped the ship a little higher up the harbour to a place, which I thought most convenient for laying her ashore in order to stop the leak. …At eight o’clock, it being high-water, I hauled her bow ashore; but kept her stern afloat, because I was afraid if neiping her; it was however necessary to lay the whole of her as near the ground as possible.’ Thursday 21, June 1770. Cook, Journals I, 3, 559.

From Hawkesworth, John; Account of the voyages undertaken by the order of His present Majesty for making discoveries in the southern hemisphere

 

References:
Beddie, M. Bibliography of Captain James Cook, RN,FRS, Circumnavigator. Sydney 1970: 932-19.
Howgego, J. Encyclopedia of Exploration to 1800. Sydney 2011: pp 38-50 ill. p. 47.
Joppien,R. & Smith, B. The Art of Captain Cook's Voyages; Vol. I, II & III. Melbourne 1985-1987: 1.172A..


Collections:
National Gallery Australia: NGA 2013.4129.9.23
National Library Australia: Bib ID 562243
National Library New Zealand: RefA-111-029-a
National Maritime Museum Greenwich: Object ID PAI3988

Sydney Parkinson (1745 - 1771)

Sydney Parkinson (17451771) Parkinson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland and from an early age his artistic abilities were noticed. He was employed by Joseph Banks in London before joining him and Daniel Solander on James Cook’s Endeavour on a circumnavigation of the globe (1768-1771) as a botanical draughtsman. During the voyage, he made at least 1,300 drawings and paintings. Parkinson was the first European to draw eucalypts. On the return voyage, he died in Batavia.

View other items by Sydney Parkinson

James Cook (1728 - 1779)

Cook was the most important navigator of the Age of Enlightenment, a period that saw the mystery of the Southland resolved, the discovery of New Zealand, Hawaii, numerous Pacific Islands and confirmation that a Northwest Passage did not exist. Cook was born in Yorkshire, England, the son of a Scottish labourer and apprenticeship for three years under John Walker, a Quaker coal-shipper of Whitby. In 1755 Walker offered him a command, but instead Cook joined HMS Eagle and within a month was master's mate. After two years on the Channel service, he was promoted master of the Pembroke, and in 1758 crossed the Atlantic in her and took part in the siege of Louisburg and the survey of the St Lawrence River that led to the capture of Quebec. Returning to England in 1762 he married Elizabeth Batts (1742-1832?) of Shadwell, whom he was to rarely see in the ensuing years at sea. Cook then famously commanded three voyages that ended with his death on the island of Hawaii on 14 February 1779.

View other items by James Cook

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