C1896

An Opening Bud.

Artist:

Louis Crusius (1862 - 1898)

Amusing medical lithograph from a calendaer illustrated by Dr Louis Crusius who initially trained as a pharmacist and later graduated from the St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1890. As a practicing Doctor, Surgeon and later Lecturer, Crusius’s … Read Full Description

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S/N: SAT-1896-CRUS-004–300612
(C109)
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Details

Full Title:

An Opening Bud.

Date:

C1896

Artist:

Louis Crusius (1862 - 1898)

Engraver:

G.H.Buek & Co. Lith N.Y 

Condition:

In good condition with two punched holes at top as issued.

Technique:

Lithograph printed in colour.

Image Size: 

175mm 
x 250mm
AUTHENTICITY
An Opening Bud. - Antique Print from 1896

Genuine antique
dated:

1896

Description:

Amusing medical lithograph from a calendaer illustrated by Dr Louis Crusius who initially trained as a pharmacist and later graduated from the St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1890. As a practicing Doctor, Surgeon and later Lecturer, Crusius’s drawings were a satirical insight into the medical profession, mostly done for friends and family, this calender was published by the Antikamnia Chemical Company of St. Louis. Crusius died prematurely in 1898. The company’s name, Antikamnia, means “opposed to pain” and its Antikamnia tablets were a patent medicine that reduced fever and relieved pain. Like Dr. Crusius, the company’s founders were graduates of the St. Louis College of Pharmacy. The calendars were a limited edition sent to doctors upon request. Many of The Antikamnia Calendars appeared after his untimely death in St. Louis on January 2, 1898. The Antikamnia Calendars and the Birth of Tylenol These mischievous little skeletons helped lead us to one of today’s most successful pain relievers. The Antikamnia company marketed an analgesic (pain-relieving) powder to pharmacists and druggists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries using these rather morbid calendars. The name of the company actually means “opposed to pain”. Antikamnia Chemical Company was later shut down after failing to disclose the active ingredient of of their pain-relieving products: Acetanilide.

Artist:

Dr. Louis Crusius (1862-1898)

Crusius was the oldest of nine children of Ludwig and Emilie Crusius, was a native of Sauk City, Wisconsin. At fifteen, he became a printer’s apprentice in the newspaper office of his father who published the local German daily. He then went to Texas to work in the drugstore of his uncle, a physician and pharmacist. About 1880, he moved to St. Louis, Missouri, where he graduated from the St. Louis College of Pharmacy in 1882. For a time, he was part owner of the drugstore of Scheel and Crusius at the corner of 14th Street and Clark Avenue, with Gustav Scheel, his brother-in-law. The show-windows of his drug store always displayed six or eight of his comic watercolor sketches. None of these remained more than a week of so, being replaced by newer creations. The partnership continued until he graduated from the St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1890 and entered the practice of medicine. He was lecturer and professor in histology at the Marion Sims Medical College, a precursor to the St. Louis University Medical Department.

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