C1595
 (1628)

Asia ex Magna Orbis Terre Descriptione Gerardi Mercatoris Desumpta studio et Indutstria.

Important map of Asia by Gerard Mercator Jnr. based extensively on his grandfather’s famous world map of 1569. From the French edition of the Mercator-Hondius atlas 1609 or 1619. This map of Asia is based on Mercators’ own 1569 world … Read Full Description

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Details

Full Title:

Asia ex Magna Orbis Terre Descriptione Gerardi Mercatoris Desumpta studio et Indutstria.

Date:

C1595
 (1628)

Condition:

In good condition, with centre fold as issued.

Technique:

Copper engraving with original hand colouring.

Image Size: 

490mm 
x 383mm

Paper Size: 

562mm 
x 465mm
AUTHENTICITY
Asia ex Magna Orbis Terre Descriptione Gerardi Mercatoris Desumpta studio et Indutstria. - Antique Map from 1595

Genuine antique
dated:

1628

Description:

Important map of Asia by Gerard Mercator Jnr. based extensively on his grandfather’s famous world map of 1569.

From the French edition of the Mercator-Hondius atlas 1609 or 1619.

This map of Asia is based on Mercators’ own 1569 world map for which he had studied all contemporary sources available, including the maps of Ortelius, Gastaldi, Gutierez, Ramusio, and the portolans of the Castilians and Portuguese. In addition, he read the works of the ancients such as Ptolemy, Pliny, Solinus and Mela, and the accounts of medieval travellers such as Marco Polo and Varthema.

The geography of Sumatra is crudely shown and includes the classical name of Tarborana (Sri Lanka) which according to Ptolemy in his Geographia, was the largest island in the world, thereby confusing mapmakers for centuries on the identity of the two islands. Northern Australia is named Terra Australis Pars and there are lines of text in the lower right providing information on the Moluccas.

The map has a decorative strapwork title and is restrained in typical Mercator style, with few other embellishments other than a single galleon at top right and a simple border surrounding the map.

From Mercator/Hondius, Atlas sive cosmographicae meditationes de fabrica mundi et fabricata figura. 

 

 

References:
Koeman, C. Atlantes Neerlandici. Amsterdam 1967. Volumes I-V: I, 8000:1A.
Sweet, M. Mapping the Continent of Asia. Singapore 1994.: 13.
Tibbetts, G. Arabia in Early Maps. Cambridge 1978: 45.
Allen, P. The Atlas of Atlases. London 1992: 68.
Parry, D. The Cartography of the East Indian Islands Insulae Indiae Orientalis. London 2005: p.76.
Quirino, C. Philippine Cartography (1320-1899) Amsterdam 2010 Manila: p.98.


Gerard Mercator (1512 - 1594)

Mercator was one of the most important and influential of c.16th map makers. A geographer, cosmographer and is best known for creating the 1569 world map based on a new projection (named after him) which represented sailing courses of constant bearing (rhumb lines) as straight lines. His knowledge of geography came from his library of over one thousand books and maps, from travellers and from his vast correspondence (in six languages) with other scholars, statesmen, travellers, merchants and seamen. Mercator's early maps were in large formats suitable for wall mounting but in the second half of his life, he produced over 100 new regional maps in a smaller format suitable for binding into his Atlas of 1595. This was the first appearance of the word Atlas in reference to a book of maps.

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Jodocus Hondius I (1563 - 1612)

Hondius senior was born in Wakken and grew up in Ghent. He was an engraver, instrument maker and globe maker. In 1584 he moved to London to escape the religious persecution in Flanders. In 1593 he moved to Amsterdam and the publisher Cornelis Claesz. in 1604 he purchased the engraving plates for the Mercator's Atlas. Hondius republished Mercator's work with 36 additional maps, including several which he himself had produced. Despite the addition of his own contributions, Hondius gave Mercator full credit as the author of the work, listing himself as the publisher. Hondius' new edition of Mercator's work was a great success. From 1605 and 1610 he engraved the maps for John Speed's, The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine. After his death, the business was continued by his widow, two sons, Jodocus II and Henricus, and son-in-law Johannes Janssonius, whose name appears on the Atlas after 1633.

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