C1853

[ASIA-INDONESIA] A Chart Showing the Navigation through the Strait of Sunda, to Batavia, &c

Mapmaker:

John Stratton Hobbs (1813 - 1874)

Rare hydrographic chart of the most commercially important body of water in Indonesia.  Very detailed chart showing the navigational route through the all important Sunda Straits to Batavia. The Sunda Straits are situated between the islands of Sumatra and Java … Read Full Description

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S/N: HYDRO-0021-ASI-INDO–232217
(M09)
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Details

Full Title:

[ASIA-INDONESIA] A Chart Showing the Navigation through the Strait of Sunda, to Batavia, &c

Date:

C1853

Mapmaker:

John Stratton Hobbs (1813 - 1874)

Condition:

In good original condition.

Technique:

Copper engraving.

Image Size: 

935mm 
x 645mm
AUTHENTICITY
[ASIA-INDONESIA] A Chart Showing the Navigation through the Strait of Sunda, to Batavia, &c - Antique Map from 1853

Genuine antique
dated:

1853

Description:

Rare hydrographic chart of the most commercially important body of water in Indonesia. 

Very detailed chart showing the navigational route through the all important Sunda Straits to Batavia.

The Sunda Straits are situated between the islands of Sumatra and Java and were historically the main route for the Dutch VOC ships to sail Batavia and then onto the all important spice islands. In 1611 the States General had legislated that all VOC ships use the Brouwer route to Batavia, which cut sailing times dramatically. This required ships to sail to Cape Town and then further south until they were in the latitudes of the ‘roaring 40s’, the strong winds that blew eastwards. The ships then had to sail as legislated for 1,000 nautical miles (just below New Holland) and then turn due north which in theory aligned them directly to the Sunda Straits. The difficulty for the Captains was being able to accurately measure their longitude and often ships came treacherously close to the west coast of New Holland.

There are are a number of insets and coastal profiles;
1. A Plan of Batavia Bay, &c
2. Plan of the Zutphen Isls.
3. Anjer Hill
4. St Nicholas Pt
5. Peak of Krakatoa
7. Thwart the Way Island
8. Zeeklip
9. Princes Island & Palembang Pt.

Institutional collection: National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London G258:11/1

Mapmaker:

John Stratton Hobbs (1813-1874)
Born in London 27 September 1813, the son of William Henry Hobbs, a ship broker of Globe Street, St. George in the East and his wife Eleanor. Worked as an engraver at Mile End and on the retirement of John Wilson Norie, Hobbs became supervisor of the Hydrographic department of the Norie firm, which was then run by Charles Wilson. He was elected to the Royal Geographical Society 9 November 1846.

John William Norie (1772-1843)
Norie was a mathematician, hydrographer, chart maker and publisher of nautical books most famous for his Epitome of Practical Navigation (1805) which became a standard work on navigation and went through many editions as did many of Norie’s works. He had begun his career working with William Heather, who had in 1765 taken over chart publishers Mount and Page and who ran the Naval Academy and Naval Warehouse in Leadenhall Street from 1795; the Naval Warehouse provided navigational instruments, charts, and books on navigation. Norie took over the Naval Warehouse after Heather’s retirement and founded the company J.W. Norie and Company in 1813. After Norie’s death the company became Norie and Wilson.

The Admiralty’s first Hydrographer, Alexander Dalrymple, was appointed in 1795 and in the next year the existing charts were brought together and catalogued. The first chart the Admiralty produced was of Quiberon Bay in Brittany and did not appear until 1800. Dalrymple was succeeded in 1808 by Captain Thomas Hurd, under whose stewardship the department was given permission to sell charts to the public. Hurd oversaw the first production of “Sailing Directions” in 1829 and the first catalogue in 1825 with 736 charts. Rear-Admiral Sir W. Edward Parry was appointed Hydrographer in 1823 after his second expedition to discover a Northwest Passage. Under Dalrymple’s successor, Captain Thomas Hurd, Admiralty charts were sold to the general public, and by 1825 there were 736 charts listed in the catalogue. In 1829 the first sailing directions were published, and in 1833, under Rear-Admiral Sir Francis Beaufort the tide tables were first published. Notices to Mariners came out in 1834, allowing for the timely correction of charts already in use. Beaufort was certainly responsible for a step change in output; by the time he left the office in 1855 the Hydrographic Office had a catalogue of nearly 2,000 charts and was producing over 130,000 charts, of which about half were provided to the Royal Navy and half sold.

Hydrographers;
1795 – 1808 Alexander Dalrymple
1808 – 1823 Captain Thomas Hurd
1823 – 1829 Rear-Admiral Sir William Parry
1829 – 1855 Rear-Admiral Sir Francis Beaufort
1855 – 1863 Rear Admiral John Washington
1863 – 1874 Vice Admiral Sir George Richards
1874 – 1884 Captain Sir Frederick Evans
1884 – 1904 Rear Admiral Sir William Wharton
1904 – 1909 Rear Admiral Mostyn Field
1909 – 1914 Rear Admiral Herbert Purey-Cust
1914 – 1919 Rear Admiral Sir John Parry
1919 – 1924 Vice Admiral Frederick Learmonth
1924 – 1932 Vice Admiral Percy Douglas
1932 – 1945 Vice Admiral Sir John Edgell
1945 – 1950 Rear Admiral Arthur Norris Wyatt

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