C1802

Bird of Paradise

Artist:

Vincent Woodthorpe (1764 - 1822)

The Lyre Bird was first sighted November 1797 by a an ex-convict who lived with the Aborigines after his term had expired. It was first caught on 26th January 1798 and was described by Thomas Davies 4th November 1800 to … Read Full Description

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S/N: BTHONSW-BI-AA-435–183591
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Details

Full Title:

Bird of Paradise

Date:

C1802

Artist:

Vincent Woodthorpe (1764 - 1822)

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Copper engraving hand coloured

Image Size: 

190mm 
x 170mm

Frame Size: 

380mm 
x 465mm
AUTHENTICITY
Bird of Paradise - Antique Print from 1802

Genuine antique
dated:

1802

Description:

The Lyre Bird was first sighted November 1797 by a an ex-convict who lived with the Aborigines after his term had expired. It was first caught on 26th January 1798 and was described by Thomas Davies 4th November 1800 to the Linnean Society of London.

1797 First sighting. An ex-convict who lived with Aboriginals after his term expired in 1792, said that there was in the bush near Sydney, “a bird of the pheasant species’. Near Sydney, John Wilson (Barrington 1802)

1798 First recorded sighting We saw nothing strange except a few rock kangaroos with long black brush tails, and two pheasants which we could not get a shot at. Nepean, John Price (Historical Records NSW, 3 Appendix C.)

1798 First capture Here I shot a bird about the size of a Pheasant, but the tail of it very much resembels a Peacock, with large long feathers which are white, orange, and lead colour, and black at the ends; its body betwixt a brown and green, brown under his neck and black upon his head. Black legs and very lond claws. Near Bargo, John Price (Historical Records NSW, 3 Appendix C.)

1798 Mimicry of the Lyrebird They sing for two hours in the morning, beginning from the time when they quit the valley, until they attain the summit of the hill; where they scrape together a small hillock, on which they stand, with their tail spread over them, imitating successively the note of every bird known in the country. South-west of Sydney David Collins (An account of the English Colony…)

1800 Scientific description The total length of this singular bird from the point of the bill to the end of the broad tail feathers is 43 inches; 25 of which are in the tail alone. The bill rather exceeds an inch i nlength, is strong, formed much like that of a peacock… Blackheath, Thomas Davies. (Transactions of the Linnean Society of London)

 

Modern binomial name Menura novaehollandiae

First described Thomas Davies 1800

Distribution VIC, NSW, QLD and introduced to Tasmania.

References Readers Digest Book of Birds 1986 p 360-361

From Barrington, The History of New South Wales…

Biography:

Vincent Woodthorpe (1764?-1822)        

Print and map engraver and copperplate printer, born in Stepney in about 1764, the son of Vincent Woodthorpe, a victualler, and his wife Elizabeth Waterhouse, who had married in 1763. Apprenticed (Tinplate Workers) to Garnet Terry 8 Jan 1778. He had premises at 27 Fetter Lane, London 1796-1809 and 29 Fetter Lane, London 1800-1822. Woodthorpe engraved a number of the illustrations for Barringtons account of the colony of New South Wales, the subjects were based on earlier issued engravings in first fleet journals.

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