C1870

Capture of power, The Victorian Bushranger, at the Glenmore Range, King River.

Very rare lithograph of the capture of Harry Power (1819–1891) the Australian bushranger, who at one time had Ned Kelly, another bushranger, serve as his accomplice while a teenager. He was christened Henry Johnson, but also known as Harry Power, … Read Full Description

$A 1,950

S/N: ISN-AA-700706007–231150
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Details

Full Title:

Capture of power, The Victorian Bushranger, at the Glenmore Range, King River.

Date:

C1870

Artist:

Unknown

Condition:

In good condition, with centre fold as issued.

Technique:

Lithograph.

Image Size: 

503mm 
x 350mm
AUTHENTICITY
Capture of power, The Victorian Bushranger, at the Glenmore Range, King River. - Antique Print from 1870

Genuine antique
dated:

1870

Description:

Very rare lithograph of the capture of Harry Power (1819–1891) the Australian bushranger, who at one time had Ned Kelly, another bushranger, serve as his accomplice while a teenager.

He was christened Henry Johnson, but also known as Harry Power, born in Waterford, Ireland on 18 May 1819 and grew up in Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire, England. When he was sixteen years of age his father had him apprenticed to the saddler trade. Later on he joined the peasants in their conflicts with the British troops. It was during this time that he received the sabre wounds on his face, which are described in the Victorian police records as, “Scar over right eyebrow, scars on right cheek.

He was convicted at Salford, Lancashire on 31 August 1840, and sentenced to transportation for 7 years to Australia for stealing a bridle and saddle. He was freed in 1848 and moved to Sydney and yy now he was calling himself Harry Power. He was engaged driving cattle all over this colony and New South Wales, and afterwards with Captain Denman’s party in exploring and cutting a track across the ranges. He became a splendid bushman, knowing almost every mile of the country. 

After shooting two German troopers he was jailed for ten years. He was released after serving six years, but was again jailed in 1864 for horse stealing. Escaping from Pentridge Prison in 1869, the 50-year-old Power turned to highway robbery. A reward of £500 was offered for his capture. There were claims that during these robberies Power had a youthful assistant who took care of the horses. Suspicion fell on the then 16-year-old Ned Kelly. Power himself was captured on 5 June 1870. Ned’s uncle betrayed him to the police. He was arrested while on their land.

In National Library Collection :  Bib ID2928914

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