C1814

Cephalotus follicularis.

Artist:

Ferdinand Bauer (1760 - 1826)

Exceptionally rare and historically important botanical illustration of the Australian pitcher plant , from Matthew Flinders account of his voyage to Terra Australis. Here offered in the superior and rarest deluxe issue. The deluxe issue of the Flinder’s atlas, has … Read Full Description

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S/N: AVTTA-BOT-AA-004–197582
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Details

Full Title:

Cephalotus follicularis.

Date:

C1814

Artist:

Ferdinand Bauer (1760 - 1826)

Condition:

In good condition. Edges with minor chips, perforations on left sheet edge from original stitching.

Technique:

Copper engraving.
AUTHENTICITY
Cephalotus follicularis. - Antique Print from 1814

Genuine antique
dated:

1814

Description:

Exceptionally rare and historically important botanical illustration of the Australian pitcher plant , from Matthew Flinders account of his voyage to Terra Australis.

Here offered in the superior and rarest deluxe issue. The deluxe issue of the Flinder’s atlas, has the botanical illustrations unfolded and with untrimmed wide margins as issued. In comparison, the standard issue of the atlas, the botanical plates are found folded multiple times, to accomodate being reduced to a quarto size and the margins are extensively trimmed.

Robert Brown the naturalist on the expedition can be called ‘The Father of Australian botany’, for his effort in collecting over 3,900 specimens, of which 140 genera were new to science. Brown’s specimens and Prodromus published in 1810 formed the foundation for George Betham’s Flora Australiensis (1863-1878).

He collected the Australian pitcher plant at King George’s Sound between 8 December 1801 to 5 January 1802.  Brown wrote on the 2nd January, ‘Remaind on board. Described a few plants. Mr Good went in search of the pitcher plant wch Messrs Bauer & Westall had found yesterday in flower. He returned with it in the evening.

Robert Brown’s collecting in Western Australia

8 December–5 January (1802) King George Sound.
9–14 January                                Lucky Bay (Bay I of the chart).
14–17 January                              Middle Island, Archipelago of Recherche (Bay II). Goose Island Bay of the plant labels.

Modern common Australian pitcher plant 

Modern binomial name  Cephalotus follicularis

First described 1806 Labillardiere (In 1802 further specimens of the plant were were collected by Jean de la Tour, botanist on the Baudin expedition. In 1806 Labillardiere used these specimens as the basis of his publication of the species in Novae Hollandiae Plantarum Specimen.) A live speciman was provided to Kew Gardens by Phillip PArker King in 1823 which flowered in 1827.

Distribution Southwest Western Australia

Biography:

Ferdinand Bauer (1760-1826)

Bauer was a botanical artist born in Austria, the son of Lukas Bauer, court painter to the Prince of Liechtenstein. Orphaned next year, the brothers later came to the notice of a priest, Norbert Boccius, who encouraged them in botanical drawing and commissioned Ferdinand, when only 15, to paint a large number of highly finished flower studies.

In about 1780 the brothers moved to Vienna where they met Baron Nikolaus von Jacquin, then working on his Icones Plantarum Rariorum, 1-3 (Vienna 1781-93). He employed Ferdinand and his brother Franz in illustrating this work. This experience and training determined their future. When Professor John Sibthorpe of Oxford visited Vienna he was so impressed by Ferdinand’s work that he engaged him as his natural history painter; they left Vienna in 1786 and travelled widely in the Mediterranean before going to England at the end of 1787.

In 1800 Sir Joseph Banks arranged for Ferdinand Bauer to join the expedition of Matthew Flinders in the Investigator to Terra Australis. Bauer worked closely with Robert Brown the naturalist and together they collected and illustrated thousands of plants. By August 1803 Bauer had made 1000 drawings of plants and 200 of animals before returning to England in 1805. By then Bauer had made 2073 drawings, of which some 1540 drawings were of Australian plants and the remainder of plants from Norfolk Island, Timor and the Cape.
 

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