C1773

Chart of New Zealand Explored in 1769 and 1770 by Lieut. J. Cook Commander of His Majesty's Bark Endeavour.

An excellent example of the first printed chart of New Zealand by James Cook from his first voyage. A seminal chart in any collection on the charting of New Zealand. Cook had been chosen to lead an expedition to the … Read Full Description

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S/N: NZ-CKE-012281A–185600
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Details

Full Title:

Chart of New Zealand Explored in 1769 and 1770 by Lieut. J. Cook Commander of His Majesty’s Bark Endeavour.

Date:

C1773

Condition:

In good condition, free of repaired tears and with wide complete margins. With folds as issued.

Technique:

Copper engraving.

Image Size: 

380mm 
x 490mm

Paper Size: 

416mm 
x 525mm
AUTHENTICITY
Chart of New Zealand Explored in 1769 and 1770 by Lieut. J. Cook Commander of His Majesty's Bark Endeavour. - Antique Map from 1773

Genuine antique
dated:

1773

Description:

An excellent example of the first printed chart of New Zealand by James Cook from his first voyage. A seminal chart in any collection on the charting of New Zealand.

Cook had been chosen to lead an expedition to the South Seas, ostensibly to observe the transit of Venus, but just prior to his departure he was given further secret instructions (dated 30 July 1768) which revealed the Admiralty’s true intent for the voyage. ‘You are to proceed to the Southward in order to make discovery of the Continent above mentioned until you arrive in the Latitude of 40°, unless you sooner fall in with it. But not having discover’d it or any Evident sign of it in that Run you are to proceed in search of it to the Westward between the Latitude before mentioned and the Latitude of 35° until’ you discover it, or fall in with the Eastern side of the Land discover’d by Tasman and now called New Zeland.’ Secret Instructions to Captain Cook, Page 1, 30th July, 1768.

Following those instructions, Cook sailed to the portion of the west coast of New Zealand that Abel Tasman had discovered in December 1742. In the following six months, between 3 October 1769 and 31 March 1770, he sailed over 2,400 miles, surveying the coast from on board the ship or else ashore.

‘The Chart which I have drawn will best point out the figure and extent of these Islands, the situation of the Bays and harbours they contain and the lesser Islands lay about them. And now I have mentioned the Chart I shall point out such places as are drawn with sufficient accuracy to be depended upon and such as are not, beginning at Cape Palliser and proceed round Aehei no mouwe [North Island] by the East Cape &ca. The Coast between these two Capes I believe to be laid down pretty accurate both in its figure and the Course and distance from point to point. The oppertunities I had and the methods I made use on to obtain these requesites were such as could hardly admit of an error; from the East Cape to Cape Maria Vandiemen altho it cannot be perfectly true yet it is without any very material error, some few places however must be expected and these are very doubtfull and are not only here but in every other part of the chart pointed out by a prick’d or broken line. …’ Cook, Journals I, 275-6

References:
Andrew 1.165A, ill.p. 162,

From Hawkesworth, An Account of the Voyages Undertaken by the Order of His Present Majesty for Making Discoveries in the Southern Hemisphere.. London.

References:
Tooley, R.V. The Mapping of Australia. London 1979: 322.
Clancy, R. The Mapping of Terra Australia. Sydney 1995: Map 7.13, ill.p. 117 (French edition).
Beddie, M. Bibliography of Captain James Cook, RN,FRS, Circumnavigator. Sydney 1970: 860, p.159.


Collections:
National Library Australia: Bib ID 729403
National Library New Zealand: apColl-Reserve-830atc/1772(1969)/Acc.33644
National Maritime Museum Greenwich: Object ID G263:1/2
British Library London: Shelfmark:Add MS 7085, f 1
State Library New South Wales: CALL NUMBERS M2 980/1770/1
State Library Victoria: MAPS SB 980 A 1769-70

James Cook (1728 - 1779)

Cook was the most important navigator of the Age of Enlightenment, a period that saw the mystery of the Southland resolved, the discovery of New Zealand, Hawaii, numerous Pacific Islands and confirmation that a Northwest Passage did not exist. Cook was born in Yorkshire, England, the son of a Scottish labourer and apprenticeship for three years under John Walker, a Quaker coal-shipper of Whitby. In 1755 Walker offered him a command, but instead Cook joined HMS Eagle and within a month was master's mate. After two years on the Channel service, he was promoted master of the Pembroke, and in 1758 crossed the Atlantic in her and took part in the siege of Louisburg and the survey of the St Lawrence River that led to the capture of Quebec. Returning to England in 1762 he married Elizabeth Batts (1742-1832?) of Shadwell, whom he was to rarely see in the ensuing years at sea. Cook then famously commanded three voyages that ended with his death on the island of Hawaii on 14 February 1779.

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