C1898

Ema

Artist:

Tsukioka Kogyo (1869 - 1927)

Tryptch woodblock from the series Nogaku hyakuban (One Hundred No Dramas) Play – Ema An Imperial emissary on his way to the Great Shrines of Ise stops overnight at Saikū nearby as it happens to be the last day of … Read Full Description

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S/N: JWB-KOGYO-088TRYP–226888
(C117)
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Details

Full Title:

Ema

Date:

C1898

Artist:

Tsukioka Kogyo (1869 - 1927)

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Woodblock.

Image Size: 

255mm 
x 380mm
AUTHENTICITY
Ema - Antique Print from 1898

Genuine antique
dated:

1898

Description:

Tryptch woodblock from the series Nogaku hyakuban (One Hundred No Dramas)

Play – Ema

An Imperial emissary on his way to the Great Shrines of Ise stops overnight at Saikū nearby as it happens to be the last day of winter and he hopes to see something of the votive tablets which are said to be hung up there during that particular night to foretell the fortunes of the coming year, a white one indicating sunny weather and a black one rain. He meets an old couple with such tablets who, after some discussion, agree to put up one of each kind to signify good fortune for everyone. They then disappear into the darkness after telling him that they are in fact two of the gods of Ise. In the second part Amaterasu, the Sun-goddess, appears with the goddess Uzume and the god Tajikarao and performs a dance. The three of them then depict the ancient story of Amaterasu’s withdrawal into a cave: as the world is plunged into darkness by her disappearance, the other gods dance and make merry and eventually succeed in enticing her out again by arousing her curiosity.

Reference;  Hinoki Shoten p. 26-28.

Biography:

Tsukioka Kogyo (1869-1927)

Although Kogyo was born the year after the beginning of the Meiji restoration, which brought Japan into the modern Western world, he was to become famous for his depiction of scenes from the traditional Japanese theatre Noh. A talented and prolific artist he was to created over 550 prints of Noh plays.

At the age of fifteen he was apprenticed to the great woodblock artist Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839-1892), who had married his mother.  Yoshitoshi, had a “lifelong fascination with Noh” and influenced his apprentice to appreciate all aspects of Noh perfomances.  After Yoshitoshi’s death, he went on to study with the painter and woodblock artist Ogata Gekko (1859-1920), who his more modern style Kogyo was to adapt for his woodblocks.

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