C1898

Tsurukame

Artist:

Tsukioka Kogyo (1869 - 1927)

Tryptch woodblock from the series Nogaku hyakuban (One Hundred No Dramas) In ancient China, a New Year celebration is being held at the Emperor’s palace. A palace official serving the emperor appears and announces the entrance of the Emperor into … Read Full Description

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S/N: JWB-KOGYO-055-TRYP–226889
(C116)
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Details

Full Title:

Tsurukame

Date:

C1898

Artist:

Tsukioka Kogyo (1869 - 1927)

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Woodblock.

Image Size: 

255mm 
x 380mm
AUTHENTICITY
Tsurukame - Antique Print from 1898

Genuine antique
dated:

1898

Description:

Tryptch woodblock from the series Nogaku hyakuban (One Hundred No Dramas)

In ancient China, a New Year celebration is being held at the Emperor’s palace. A palace official serving the emperor appears and announces the entrance of the Emperor into the Moon Palace. The aristocrats within his court are all encouraged to come to see His Majesty. When the emperor comes at the Gate of Eternal Youth to see the shining sun of the New Year, all of his people raise their voices in celebration of the New Year, echoing even to Heaven. The garden of the palace is filled with gold, silver and gems and appears exquisite. In this atmosphere filled with joy and beauty, the Senior Minister of His Imperial Majesty steps forward and encourages His Majesty to have the crane and tortoise dance to music as happened in the past and hold a music party afterwards at the Moon Palace. When a crane and tortoise dance to celebrate His Majesty’s longevity, the delighted emperor himself dances as well. After the aristocrats have also danced and enlivened the gathering, the emperor gets on a palanquin to return to the Hall of Everlasting Life.

Biography:

Tsukioka Kogyo (1869-1927)

Although Kogyo was born the year after the beginning of the Meiji restoration, which brought Japan into the modern Western world, he was to become famous for his depiction of scenes from the traditional Japanese theatre Noh. A talented and prolific artist he was to create over 550 prints of Noh plays.

At the age of fifteen he was apprenticed to the great woodblock artist Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839-1892), who had married his mother. Yoshitoshi, had a “lifelong fascination with Noh” and influenced his apprentice, to appreciate all aspects of Noh perfomances.  After Yoshitoshi’s death, he went on to study with the painter and woodblock artist Ogata Gekko (1859-1920), who had a more modern style which Kogyo was to adapt for his woodblocks.

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