C1885

Departure of the Troops from New South Wales.

Scarce engraving from the original edition of the Illustrated Sydney News of the departure or the troops for Soudan. “The Imperial Government having decided to withdraw the troops lately distributed throughout the, Australian colonies, to Great Britain, vessels have been … Read Full Description

$A 195

S/N: ISN-MIL-700906045B–232136
(C068)
Free Shipping

Within Australia

All orders ship free
within Australia

Rest of the World

Orders over A$300
ship free worldwide

See Shipping page for Terms & Conditions

Details

Full Title:

Departure of the Troops from New South Wales.

Date:

C1885

Artist:

Unknown

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Hand coloured engraving.

Image Size: 

235mm 
x 177mm
AUTHENTICITY
Departure of the Troops from New South Wales. - Antique Print from 1885

Genuine antique
dated:

1885

Description:

Scarce engraving from the original edition of the Illustrated Sydney News of the departure or the troops for Soudan.

“The Imperial Government having decided to withdraw the troops lately distributed throughout the, Australian colonies, to Great Britain, vessels have been chartered at the various ports, and the soldiers have departed. It is quite probable that we have looked upon the British soldier, as part’ of Our internal defence, for the last time ; and now have to take upon our own shoulders the responsibility of managing our military affairs. The departure of the 18th marks a new era in the history of Australia, and was considered so important that some thousands of people-of all classes and conditions-assembled on the Circular Quay ” to see the last of the soldiers.” The Silver Eagle was the vessel selected for their conveyance home. Shortly after two o’clock on Tuesday, 23rd August, the Royal Artillery left their barracks at Dawes’ Point, headed by the band of the Naval Brigade, and marched to the scene of embarkation. The other detachment of the force, comprising two companies of the 18th Regiment of the Line, fell into order at the Victoria Barracks, Paddington, at a quarter past two o’clock, arid commenced their final march on Australian soil. They were headed by the band of the Sydney Battalion of Volunteer Rifles, who played various inspiriting airs at intervals on the way and during the embarkation. A large number of persons accompanied the procession, and the train was swelled every minute. On the South Head Road there was a vast concourse of spectators, the pathways, shop doors, and windows being crowded. The line of march was along College and Macquarie street. The crowd must have numbered several thousands at this time. The detachment of the ISth Regiment included Lieutenant-Colonel Elliott, Captain Dawson, Lieutenant and Adjutant Cornish, Lieutenants Pearson and S windley, Ensigns Powell and Graves, Surgeon Young, and Quarter-master O’Hara ; about 140 non-commissioned olïicprs rank and file, with whom were 24 women and 70 children. The Artillery included Captain Graham, Lieutenants ford and North. Dr. Piddes, Sergeant-Major Todd, and 7G rank and file, with whom were 10 women and 23 children. In about an hour all were embarked and immediately afterwards the tug Cobra took the Silver Eagle in tow, and the vessel moved slowly away amid the cheers of the crowd, and the strains of the bands playing’. “Auld Lang Syne.”

Choose currency

Exchange rates are only indicative. All orders will be processed in Australian dollars. The actual amount charged may vary depending on the exchange rate and conversion fees applied by your credit card issuer.

Login

Register

Search

The List

Join our exclusive mailing list for first access to new acquisitions and special offers.