C1848

[Eton Wick]

Very early map of Eton Wick showing the proposed Great Western Railway line. After the construction of Eton College in the 15th century, a small group of houses were built immediately west of the college grounds to house, shoemakers, tailors, and … Read Full Description

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Details

Full Title:

[Eton Wick]

Date:

C1848

Mapmaker:

Unknown

Condition:

In good condition, with folds as issued.

Technique:

Hand coloured lithograph.

Paper Size: 

275mm 
x 445mm
AUTHENTICITY
[Eton Wick] - Antique Map from 1848

Genuine antique
dated:

1848

Description:

Very early map of Eton Wick showing the proposed Great Western Railway line. After the construction of Eton College in the 15th century, a small group of houses were built immediately west of the college grounds to house, shoemakers, tailors, and other workers who worked in the college, the hamlet was physically separated from the rest of Eton by land owned by the college, and was known as the wick. Throughout the 19th century, scholars at Eton College took a personal interest in the village, building a village hall and a small school in the village, the college was traditionally responsible for the social well-being of the settlement.

The construction of the Great Western Railway main line to Bristol was originally intended to pass through Windsor, Reading and Oxford. The University of Oxford objected, considering that such an innovation was a danger to life and limb; likewise objections were raised by Windsor Castle and Eton College authorities, resulting in the railway being diverted and constructed at a more respectful distance from these places. Within a short time plans were also put forward for a branch line from Slough to Windsor, but again objections were put forward by Eton College and some leading citizens of Eton which delayed the line for fourteen years. The inhabitants of Eton were summoned to a meeting on October 2, 1846, to consider the railway company’s proposal. The calling of the meeting was signed by the town’s most influential people, with the Provost of Eton heading the list. Opposition to the proposal was voted out and the project was carried through. Certain obligations were imposed on the railway authorities, one being to place a watchman on the line to keep Eton boys from endangering their lives or the lives of passengers. The railway to Windsor was completed in 1849.

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