C1878

Interior of the Royal Victoria Theatre, Sydney

Joseph Wyatt, a retired haberdasher and property owner, who had leased, purchased then closed Barnett Levey’s Theatre Royal in 1838, also constructed his own theatre in Pitt Street between King and Market Streets. The foundation stone of his ROYAL VICTORIA … Read Full Description

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S/N: SI48-NS-031–220933
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Details

Full Title:

Interior of the Royal Victoria Theatre, Sydney

Date:

C1878

Engraver:

F.Mansell 

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Hand coloured engraving.

Image Size: 

220mm 
x 170mm
AUTHENTICITY
Interior of the Royal Victoria Theatre, Sydney - Antique Print from 1878

Genuine antique
dated:

1878

Description:

Joseph Wyatt, a retired haberdasher and property owner, who had leased, purchased then closed Barnett Levey’s Theatre Royal in 1838, also constructed his own theatre in Pitt Street between King and Market Streets. The foundation stone of his ROYAL VICTORIA THEATRE was laid on 7 September 1836 but his theatre was not opened until 1838. The auditorium, with the pit boarded over, was first used for the St. Patrick’s Day ball on 17 March 1838, and the theatre was formally opened nine days later with a performance of `Othello’ featuring George Arabin and his wife, and the farce `The Middy on Shore’. The Royal Victoria then served Sydney as its major theatre until 1880.

Joseph Hutchins Fowles (1810 - 1878)

Fowles arrived in Sydney from London in August 1838, accompanied by his wife, as cabin passenger on the Fortune. He came to public attention in 1847 with his contributions to the first exhibition of the Society for the Promotion of Fine Arts in Australia. In July 1848 Fowles issued the first part of his series Sydney in 1848 which contained 'elegant' streets and buildings which were made with painstaking accuracy 'to remove the erroneous and discreditable notions current in England concerning this city'. By 1858 Fowles had won a new reputation when Bell's Life in Sydney and Sporting Chronicle designated him 'Our Colonial Herring' as a result of a series of portraits of 'celebrated Australian cracks', racehorses and riding horses. By 1855 Fowles was training and examining young art teachers in drawing for the National Board of Education. In an obituary notice he was described as 'Father of drawing in the city'.

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