C1830

[Japanese Anatomical engravings]

Very rare Japanese printed Dutch anatomical engravings (59), in their original kiri-wood case with sliding top. These prints are based on the medical teachings of Philipp Franz Balthasar von Sieboldthrough, which came into Deshima, a small artificial island built in Nagasaki … Read Full Description

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S/N: BOX-MEDICAL–230686
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Details

Full Title:

[Japanese Anatomical engravings]

Date:

C1830

Artist:

Unknown

Condition:

Some wear to engravings, otherwise in good condition.

Technique:

Wooden box with individual engraved plates.

Image Size: 

215mm 
x 190mm
AUTHENTICITY
[Japanese  Anatomical engravings] - Antique Print from 1830

Genuine antique
dated:

1830

Description:

Very rare Japanese printed Dutch anatomical engravings (59), in their original kiri-wood case with sliding top. These prints are based on the medical teachings of Philipp Franz Balthasar von Sieboldthrough, which came into Deshima, a small artificial island built in Nagasaki harbour. Each engraving measures 190mm x 215mm.

Philipp Franz Balthasar von Siebold (17 February 1796 – 18 October 1866) was a German physician, botanist, and traveller who arrived in Japan in 1820. He achieved prominence for his studies of Japanese flora and fauna and the introduction of Western medicine in Japan. In 1824, Siebold started a medical school in Nagasaki. He was the father of the first female Japanese doctor, Kusumoto Ine.

The Dutch East India Company had run a trading post on the island of Hirado from 1609. After the expulsion of the Portuguese in 1639 the VOC were the only Westerners with trade access to Japan from their Hirado trading post. For 33 years they were allowed to trade relatively freely. Christian-era year dates were used on the stonework of the new warehouses and these were used in 1640 as a pretext to demolish the buildings and relocate the trading post to Nagasaki. With the expulsion of the Portuguese Dejima suffered without the annual trading with Portuguese ships from Macau, the economy of Nagasaki suffered greatly. The Dutch were forced by government officials to move from Hirado to Dejima. From 1641 on, only Chinese and Dutch ships were allowed to come to Japan, and Nagasaki harbour was the only harbour they were permitted to enter.

Biography:

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