C1663
 (1714)

Orbis Terrarum Tabula Recens Emendata et in Lucen Edita.

Mapmaker:

Nicolaas Visscher (1618 - 1679)

Superb double-hemisphere world map decorated with the four continents shown in allegorical form, with examples of their animal life and inhabitants. Two circular diagrams depicting the Ptolemaic and Copernican theories of the solar system are depicted at top and bottom … Read Full Description

Sold

S/N: WM-1714-VISS–184382
Categories:
Free Shipping

Within Australia

All orders ship free
within Australia

Rest of the World

Orders over A$300
ship free worldwide

See Shipping page for Terms & Conditions

Details

Full Title:

Orbis Terrarum Tabula Recens Emendata et in Lucen Edita.

Date:

C1663
 (1714)

Mapmaker:

Nicolaas Visscher (1618 - 1679)

Condition:

In good condition, centre fold as issued.

Technique:

Image Size: 

465mm 
x 355mm

Frame Size: 

845mm 
x 695mm
AUTHENTICITY
Orbis Terrarum Tabula Recens Emendata et in Lucen Edita. - Antique Print from 1663

Genuine antique
dated:

1714

Description:

Superb double-hemisphere world map decorated with the four continents shown in allegorical form, with examples of their animal life and inhabitants. Two circular diagrams depicting the Ptolemaic and Copernican theories of the solar system are depicted at top and bottom between the hemispheres. This was the second world map prepared by Nicolaas Visscher for insertion in a Dutch bible published by Pieter en Jacob Keur with a new address below the plate mark and engraved by Daniel Stoopendaal. This map can be distinguished from Visscher&#8217s bible map of 1657 by the shorter title, which is now displayed in a banner rather than in a panel. Australia is shown with the discoveries made by Tasman on his first voyage 1642-3 and second voyage 1644. Earlier Dutch discoveries are noted and these include: Hartog 1616, Houtman 1619, van Leeuwin 1622, Cartensz 1623, Nuyts 1627 and de Wit 1628. The earliest Dutch discovery of the Australian coast by Willem Jansz in 1606 on Cape York Peninsula is not shown. The VOC, in having sent Tasman on two voyages, not only to chart the South Land but importantly to make contact with the natives and to &#8216engage in trade&#8217, were disappointed with the lack of trading opportunities present in the barren and inhospitable land. Consequently, the VOC lost interest in further charting of the Australian continent other than the updating of existing charts. The post-Tasman shape of Australia depicted on maps was to remain unchanged until James Cook discovered and charted the east coast in 1770. References: Poortman 130. ill.p.196, Shirley 431, pl 318.

Choose currency

Exchange rates are only indicative. All orders will be processed in Australian dollars. The actual amount charged may vary depending on the exchange rate and conversion fees applied by your credit card issuer.

Login

Register

Search

The List

Join our exclusive mailing list for first access to new acquisitions and special offers.