C1799

Partie de la cote sud-ouest de la Nouvelle Hollande avec les routes de la corvette la Decouverte et sa conserve le Chatham commandes par Georges Vancouver, en l'annee 1791.

The rare superior French edition of this important chart of which is made up of a number of insets, ‘printed in both a more attractive manner and on better paper than the English edition’ (Forbes). Inset are of: Cape Chatham, Cape Howe, … Read Full Description

$A 2,450

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S/N: VANC-AM-WA-1799–186225
(MD-16)
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Full Title:

Partie de la cote sud-ouest de la Nouvelle Hollande avec les routes de la corvette la Decouverte et sa conserve le Chatham commandes par Georges Vancouver, en l’annee 1791.

Date:

C1799

Condition:

In good condition, centre fold as issued

Technique:

Copper engraving.

Image Size: 

745mm 
x 590mm
AUTHENTICITY
Partie de la cote sud-ouest de la Nouvelle Hollande avec les routes de la corvette la Decouverte et sa conserve le Chatham commandes par Georges Vancouver, en l'annee 1791. - Antique Map from 1799

Genuine antique
dated:

1799

Description:

The rare superior French edition of this important chart of which is made up of a number of insets, ‘printed in both a more attractive manner and on better paper than the English edition’ (Forbes).

Inset are of: Cape Chatham, Cape Howe, King George’s Sound, Point Hood, the Snares and Oparo Island.

Vancouver had been given permission to examine ‘that extent of coast of the south-west side of New Holland, which in the present age appears a real blot in geography’. He planned ‘to fall in with the S.W. Cape of New Holland, and should I find the shores capable of being navigated without much hazard to range its coast and determine whether it and Van Diemen’s Land are joined, which from all information at present extant appears somewhat doubtful’. On 26 September he sighted land near Cape Leeuwin and, sailing south-east, named Capes Chatham and Howe. Two days later the ships entered a spacious harbour which he named King George the Third’s Sound. Vancouver also named Oyster Bay and other features, claiming them for Great Britain. He reported on the terrain, animal life and the native inhabitants, and planted watercress, vines, almonds, oranges, lemons and pumpkins ‘for the benefit of future visitors’. On 11 October the ships journeyed east, surveying some 300 miles (483 km) of coast, ‘in which space we saw no other haven or place of security for shipping than the Sound before mentioned’ and, in the westernmost part of the Recherche Archipelago, reached a rocky island which Vancouver called Termination Island.

Adverse winds prevented him from examining the Great Australian Bight, and relinquishing ‘with great reluctance’ this ‘favourite project’, he sailed south of Van Diemen’s Land. The two ships were separated; off the southern tip of New Zealand Vancouver encountered ‘7 craggy islands’ which he named The Snares, and the Chatham discovered and named Chatham Island.

From Vancouver, G., Voyage de decouvertes, a l’ocean Pacifique du Nord, et autour du monde; dans lequel la cote Nord-Ouest de l’Amerique….

References:
Howgego, J. Encyclopedia of Exploration to 1800. Sydney 2011 – V13.
Sabin, J. A Dictionary of Books Relating to America, from its Discovery to the Present Time. New York. (1936) 1967 – 98441.
Tooley, R.V. Mapping of Australia. London 1979 -1278

 

Captain George Vancouver (1757 - 1798)

Vancouver was a Royal Navy officer best known for his 1791–1795 expedition, which explored and charted the Hawaiian Islands, the southwest coast of Australia and North America's northwestern Pacific Coast regions, including the coasts of what are now the Canadian province of British Columbia as well as the US states of Alaska, Washington and Oregon. Vancouver served on Captain Cook's second and third voyages, and was stationed in the West Indies for some years before being asked to undertake a hydrographic survey of the northwest coast of America. This followed the signing of the Nootka Sound Convention in 1790 which confirmed the rights of Britain in the region. Between leaving Falmouth in 1791 and returning home in 1795, Vancouver’s two ships sailed about 55,000 miles. ‘This voyage became one of the most important ever made in the interests of geographical knowledge’ (Hill). Over three summer surveying seasons, Vancouver circumnavigated the island subsequently named after him, and disproved the existence of a passage between the Pacific and Hudson's Bay. His men covered more than 10,000 miles in small boats, and delineated more than 1700 miles of coastline with unerring accuracy. He died before his journal could be published.

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