C1895

[PLATYPUS] Das Schnabeltier (Ornithorynehus anatinus).

Scarce c.19th German engraving of a Platypus. The first description and known sighting was from a captured animal November 1797 David Collins on the Hawkesbury River. When the first skin sent by John Hunter, reached Europe it was thought to … Read Full Description

$A 55

S/N: AUOZ-ANI-AA-243–221092
(B009 FM-03)
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Details

Full Title:

[PLATYPUS] Das Schnabeltier (Ornithorynehus anatinus).

Date:

C1895

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Hand coloured engraving.

Image Size: 

130mm 
x 45mm
AUTHENTICITY
[PLATYPUS] Das Schnabeltier (Ornithorynehus anatinus). - Antique Print from 1895

Genuine antique
dated:

1895

Description:

Scarce c.19th German engraving of a Platypus.

The first description and known sighting was from a captured animal November 1797 David Collins on the Hawkesbury River. When the first skin sent by John Hunter, reached Europe it was thought to be a hoax.

Modern binomial name; Ornithorhynchus anatinus
First described; Shaw 1799
Distribution; SA, VIC, TAS, NSW & QLD

 

Gustav Ludwig Heinrich Mutzel (1839 - 1893)

Mutzel was a German artist, famous for his mammal and bird paintings, including the illustrations for the second edition of Alfred Edmund Brehm's Thierleben and Richard Lydekker's The Royal Natural History. He was the son of the painter Heinrich Mutzel and his wife Luise Pauline Friedrichs. He attended the French high school in his hometown. Subsequently Mutzel began to study at the Academy of Art at age 18 and was, amongst others, a pupil of the painter Eduard Daege. On 1 November 1865 Mützel married Anna Schönherr in Berlin and raised three children; Hans, Walter and Gertrud. Mützel and his wife settled in Königsberg in the Neumark, where he was active as photographer. To keep up with the latest technical developments in photography Mützel and his family moved to Berlin in 1870. After the Franco-German War Mützel started illustrating some of the more important encyclopedias of the time. He created a large number of illustrations for the German Ornithological Society, having been a member since 1874. Mutzel's diverse interests led also to his membership of the German Society for Anthropology, Ethnology and Prehistory and the Association of Berlin artists. The Nielsen's che Choral Society awarded him with an honorary membership. Gustav Mutzel died on 29 October 1893.

View other items by Gustav Ludwig Heinrich Mutzel

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