C1834

Plyctolophus Leadbeateri. Tricolour-crested Cockatoo. Native of Australia. [Major Mitchell Cockatoo.]

C19th engraving of a Major Mitchell Cockatoo by Edward Lear. Named in honour of Major Sir Thomas Mitchell, who wrote, “Few birds more enliven the monotonous hues of the Australian forest than this beautiful species whose pink-coloured wings and flowing … Read Full Description

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S/N: TNLPC-013-BI-AA–200040
(B008)
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Details

Full Title:

Plyctolophus Leadbeateri. Tricolour-crested Cockatoo. Native of Australia. [Major Mitchell Cockatoo.]

Date:

C1834

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Copper engraving with original hand colouring.

Image Size: 

90mm 
x 160mm
AUTHENTICITY
Plyctolophus Leadbeateri. Tricolour-crested Cockatoo. Native of Australia. [Major Mitchell Cockatoo.] - Antique Print from 1834

Genuine antique
dated:

1834

Description:

C19th engraving of a Major Mitchell Cockatoo by Edward Lear. Named in honour of Major Sir Thomas Mitchell, who wrote, “Few birds more enliven the monotonous hues of the Australian forest than this beautiful species whose pink-coloured wings and flowing crest might have embellished the air of a more voluptuous region.”

From the Naturalist Library.

Common names Major Mitchell’s Cockatoo & Leadbeater’s Cockatoo

Modern binomial name Lophochroa leadbeateri

First described Vigors 1831

Distribution Australia wide (mainland).

Reference Reader’s Digest Book of Birds1982 second edition Page: 281, ill.

Edward Lear (1812 - 1888)

Lear was was an English artist, illustrator, musician, author and poet. By the age of 16 was already drawing "for bread and cheese" and soon developed into a serious "ornithological draughtsman" employed by the Zoological Society and then from 1832 to 1836 by the Earl of Derby, who kept a private menagerie at his estate, Knowsley Hall. He was the first major bird artist to draw birds from real live birds, instead of skins. Lear's first publication, published when he was 19 years old, was Illustrations of the Family of Psittacidae, or Parrots in 1830. One of the greatest ornithological artists of his era, he taught Elizabeth Gould whilst also contributing to John Gould's works and was compared favourably to the naturalist John James Audubon. His eyesight deteriorated too much, to work with such precision on the fine drawings and etchings.

View other items by Edward Lear

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