C1522
 (1541)

Tabula Orbis cum Descriptione Ventorum. Orbis typus universalis iuxta hydrographorum traditionem exactissime depicta. 1522. L. F.

Famous c.16th map by Lorenz Fries and one of the first to name America, embellished with an elegant scrolled rope border design with the names of winds. Fries’ map is much sought after as it somehow reflects the ambiguities of … Read Full Description

Sold

(RW 07)
Categories: ,
Free Shipping

Within Australia

All orders ship free
within Australia

Rest of the World

Orders over A$300
ship free worldwide

See Shipping page for Terms & Conditions

Details

Full Title:

Tabula Orbis cum Descriptione Ventorum. Orbis typus universalis iuxta hydrographorum traditionem exactissime depicta. 1522. L. F.

Date:

C1522
 (1541)

Condition:

Repaired worm hole at top of centre fold, otherwise in very good condition with good wide margins.

Technique:

Woodcut.

Image Size: 

475mm 
x 316mm

Paper Size: 

540mm 
x 413mm
AUTHENTICITY
Tabula Orbis cum Descriptione Ventorum. Orbis typus universalis iuxta hydrographorum traditionem exactissime depicta. 1522. L. F. - Antique Map from 1522

Genuine antique
dated:

1541

Description:

Famous c.16th map by Lorenz Fries and one of the first to name America, embellished with an elegant scrolled rope border design with the names of winds.

Fries’ map is much sought after as it somehow reflects the ambiguities of his age. A framework of medieval thinking is having to be re-cast in order to accept the as yet unrealised extent of the newly conquered lands. (Rodney Shirley p.55)

The map was first issued in 1522, in Fries, Ptomley’s, Geographia, this example is from the fourth and last edition of 1541 of the Geographia printed in Vienna. The first of the two modern world maps in this edition, is Fries own rendering and is dated 1522 and initialed L.F. in the main title. This edition of Fries map is identified by the new head-title and the horizontal crack to the woodblock which appears up to ‘Affrica‘ possibly caused by the addition of the extra title, and numbered ’50’ at lower right on verso.

Unlike most of Fries other maps which were based on Waldseemuller’s 1513 edition of Ptolemy’s Geographia, this map was his own creation and a modern map for its time. Fries has reduced the number of Indian peninsulas from three to two” (Karrow p. 198). It is one of the earliest to name “America”, but showing just the southern part of the continent.

From Fries, L. Geographia Vienna 1541

The four editions of Fries, Geographia:

1522 Printed in Strassburg: First edition which included: the earliest map showing the name ‘America’ which is likely to be available to collectors (Moreland & Bannister)
1525 Printed in Strassburg: reissue of the 1522 edition
1535 Printed in Lyon: reissue of 1522, edited by Michael Servetus who was subsequently tried for heresy and burned at the stake in 1553, ostensibly because of derogatory comments in the atlas about the Holy Land –
         the fact that the notes in question had not even been written by Servetus, but were copied from earlier editions, left his Calvinist persecutors unmoved. (Moreland & Bannister)
1541 Printed in Vienna (Dauphine): reissue of the Lyon edition with the offensive comments about the Holy Land have been deleted. (Moreland & Bannister)

References:
Shirley, R. The Mapping of the World Early Printed World Maps 1472-1700. London 1987: Entry 48, Plate 47.
Karrow, R. Mapmakers of the Sixteenth Century and their Maps. Bio-Bibliographies of the Cartographers of Abraham Ortelius, 1570. Chigago 1993.: 194ff. u. 28/51.
Mickwitz & Miekkavaara, The A.E. Nordenskiold Collection: Annotated Catalogue of Maps made up to 1800. Helsinki 1979-1995: Plate XXXIX (1).


Collections:
National Library Australia: Bib ID 8057018
State Library New South Wales: CALL NUMBERS F53/1 (1535)

Lorenz Fries (1490 - 1532)

Fries was born in Alsace around 1490 and studied medicine at university. Having successfully completed his education, Fries established himself as a physician and settled in Strasbourg, in about 1519. He wrote on medical topics and met the Strasbourg printer and publisher Johann Gruninger, an associate of the St. Die group of scholars formed by, among others, Walter Lud, Martin Ringmann and Martin Waldseemuller. Gruninger was responsible for printing several of the maps prepared by Waldseemuller, and for supervising the cutting the wood blocks for the maps, for the 1513 edition of Ptolemy, edited by the group. The major project that Fries and Gruninger worked on was a new edition of the Geographia of Claudius Ptolemy, which was published by Johann Koberger in 1522.

View other items by Lorenz Fries

Choose currency

Exchange rates are only indicative. All orders will be processed in Australian dollars. The actual amount charged may vary depending on the exchange rate and conversion fees applied by your credit card issuer.

Login

Register

The List

Join our exclusive mailing list for first access to new acquisitions and special offers.