C1877

The Bulli Pass.-Scene of the Recent Coach accident.

Rare engraving showing Mr. Thomas Kelly’s day coach from Campbelltown to Wollongong hurtling over the edge on present day Lawrence Hargrave Drive where the new Sea Cliff Bridge is. THE BULLI PASS SCENE OF THE RECENT COACH ACCIDENT. Coach Accident … Read Full Description

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S/N: TACJ-NC-7712291121–359223
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Details

Full Title:

The Bulli Pass.-Scene of the Recent Coach accident.

Date:

C1877

Artist:

Unknown

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Hand coloured engraving.

Image Size: 

202mm 
x 250mm
AUTHENTICITY
The Bulli Pass.-Scene of the Recent Coach accident. - Antique View from 1877

Genuine antique
dated:

1877

Description:

Rare engraving showing Mr. Thomas Kelly’s day coach from Campbelltown to Wollongong hurtling over the edge on present day Lawrence Hargrave Drive where the new Sea Cliff Bridge is.

THE BULLI PASS SCENE OF THE RECENT COACH ACCIDENT. Coach Accident at the Bulli Pass. ON the 18th instant a very serious accident was sustained by Mr. Thomas Kelly’s day coach, from Campbelltown to Wollongong, whilst descending the Bulli Mountain Pass. Very shortly after commencing the descent from the top of the mountain one of the hind wheels of the coach bilged inwards to such an extent that the break wholly lost its hold of it. This having occurred, the coach pushed forward to the pole horses, which took fright in consequence, and dashed away down the pass, pushing the two leaders before them. They had not gone far when the whole team were almost at full gallop. We may here state that there were eight passengers in the coach, including three ladies, an infant, a little girl, Mr. Hugh Taylor, M.P., of Parramatta, and two other gentlemen. Mr. Taylor and one of the other gentlemen passengers were on the box with Kelly, who was driving. Seeing the imminent danger that presented itself, Kelly handed Mr. Taylor the reins of the leading horses, whilst he (Kelly) endeavoured to arrest the pace of the polers. The united efforts of Kelly and Mr. Taylor, however, proved unavailing to stop, or even steady the mad career of the affrighted team down the mountain. The furious pace was continued until the place known as the “Elbow” was reached, and here an almost certain prospect of a capsize presented itself. And, unfortunately, the worst expectations were realised, for, on reaching the sharp turn, one of the leading horses tripped and fell, and no sooner had he done so than the whole team, coach and passengers, went over the south side of the road with a crash, the coach turning over not less than two or three times before it finally settled. The horses also turned somersaults in a similar manner, the polers finally becoming fixed heels uppermost, and the leaders almost inextricably jammed in a network of vines. And as regarded the passenger and driver, they were thrown everywhere all having sustained injuries of more or less ex- tent, except the infant and the little girl who fortunately escaped almost, if not altogether, scatheless. Some of the passengers were very much cut and bruised, and were bleeding profusely, the scene being altogether a most startling and painful one. It was found, however, that all were able to scramble on to the road, with the exception of a lady from Macquarie River, who was rendered quite helpless by her injuries. The noise made by the coach in coming down the mountain was so great that it was distinctly heard at the Bulli Colliery, which is situated at no great distance to the south ward of where the capsize took place. Perceiving that an accident must have occurred, several men rushed over from the colliery to the scene of the mishap, and willingly rendered all the assistance they could under the circumstances, such kind assistance being as much needed as it was generously and voluntarily given. At the request of Mr. Kelly, one or more of the miners went off to Bulli to secure a vehicle in which to have the passengers conveyed to Wollongong. In the meanwhile several of the miners’ wives from the neighbourhood reached the scene with some refreshments for the unfortunate passengers. After some considerable delay, Mr. Bennett, of Bulli, arrived with his coach and conveyed the greater number of passengers to Wollongong, where they received medical attendance. Mr. Kelly states that the accident resulted from a cause over which he had no control, the wheel which bulged inwards from the brake being a new one that had been on the coach only about a fortnight. The spokes became loose in the nave, and turned inwards, hence the cause of the mishap.

From the original edition of the Town and Country Journal.

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