C1784

The Natche,a Ceremony in Honour of the King's Son, in Tongataboo.

Rare engraving from the official British Admiralty sanctioned edition of the accounts of Cook’s third and final voyage. All other later copies made of this image by other publishers were unauthorised, usually smaller and inferior in quality. While on Tongatapu … Read Full Description

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Details

Full Title:

The Natche,a Ceremony in Honour of the King’s Son, in Tongataboo.

Date:

C1784

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Copper engraving.

Image Size: 

495mm 
x 320mm
AUTHENTICITY
The Natche,a Ceremony in Honour of the King's Son, in Tongataboo. - Antique Print from 1784

Genuine antique
dated:

1784

Description:

Rare engraving from the official British Admiralty sanctioned edition of the accounts of Cook’s third and final voyage. All other later copies made of this image by other publishers were unauthorised, usually smaller and inferior in quality.

While on Tongatapu from 10 June to 10 July 1777, Cook and his men recorded Tongan ceremonies and culture.

The most unusual and extraordinary ceremony observed during Cook’s stay at Tongatapu was the Inasi ceremony (depicted), which took place at Mua from 8 to 9 July. The ceremony was centred upon the son of Fatafehi Paulaho, the sacred King of Tonga (Tu’i Tonga), and was probably performed in honour of his coming of age. Several thousand were involved, most of whom entered the performing area with sticks about four feet long. They approached a shelter or small hut in which Paulaho, his son and other people of distinction were seated.

Beddie 1743-22, p.359A, Joppien 3.61A, ill.p.324, pl.41,p.39

From Cook & King,A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean Undertaken by the Command of His Majesty, for Making Discoveries in the Northern Hemisphere….

John Webber (1752 - 1793)

Official artist on Cook's third and last voyage. The reasons for the voyage were to return Omai and explore the possibility of a north-west passage along the North American continent. Webber was required to "give a more perfect idea thereof than can be formed by written description." Webber's oeuvre from the voyage was the most comprehensive record of sights in the Pacific region ever produced.

View other items by John Webber

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