C1821

The R_L Libertine reclaimed, or the Anticipation of a Reconciliation.

Artist:

William McCleary

Irish issue of John Lewis Marks satirical cartoon depicting George IV and Caroline of Brunswick.George IV sits on the throne with Caroline beside him; his arm is round her shoulders and he turns to her to say: “(He that findeth … Read Full Description

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S/N: CARIC-049–183448
(C120)
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Details

Full Title:

The R_L Libertine reclaimed, or the Anticipation of a Reconciliation.

Date:

C1821

Artist:

William McCleary

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Etching with original hand colouring. On blue backing paper.

Image Size: 

330mm 
x 225mm
AUTHENTICITY
The R_L Libertine reclaimed, or the Anticipation of a Reconciliation. - Antique Print from 1821

Genuine antique
dated:

1821

Description:

Irish issue of John Lewis Marks satirical cartoon depicting George IV and Caroline of Brunswick.

George IV sits on the throne with Caroline beside him; his arm is round her shoulders and he turns to her to say: “(He that findeth a wife findeth good.)—My dear Q***n, If constancy & love can make any amends for my past follies, I still may hope of a Reconciliation, do not go abroad again, to stay at home, is a great sign of the loyalty of marriage. ”Beneath the glitt’ring weight of crowns he’d groan”, “Unless the genial bed relieve the throne.” You may depend on it, I have turn’d up all those wanton Devils, I am sick of fat, I think no better of them than M. Raggou’s Mistress who was whore to the whole troop. “A worthy Woman, saith Solomon is a Crown to her Husband!” 

He is caricatured, wearing royal robes and ruff. The Queen, who wears a small crown and royal robes, is handsome, affectionate, and unrecognizable. Her foot is on the royal footstool, and the crown is beside her. Leaning against the dais is an open book: ‘Proverbs—She will do him good not evil all the days of her Life.’ 

In the foreground (right) lies a portfolio of ‘Bought up Caricatures’. On a projecting print is ‘Marks fect’, which serves as signature. 

The King’s left arm is extended towards a crowd of angry and weeping women who are in a landscape which serves as background. Five in the forefront wear coronets. These say: “Oh! the wicked deceiver he shall know that women are either Angels or Devils”; “Oh! the Jerry Sneak” [from Foote’s ‘Mayor of Garratt’]; “Let me come past, let me come past I’m going to drown’d myself”; “I shall hang myself”; “I wont go home to the Old Stick of my husband he can do nothing for me”; “Who would have thougt [sic] it after I experienced so much of his favour.” 

One of the undifferentiated crowd says: “I shall go to the Magdalen” [asylum]. 

In the background are tiny figures: on the left a woman hangs from the branch of a rotten tree, above water in which one woman is almost submerged; another is about to plunge in, while a third runs towards it. 

On a hill on the right six lean and antlered men wearing court-suits dance holding hands; one says: “Dance away my Bucks, we shall have all our Ribs returned.” r devils!”

Collections:
British Museum 
1935,0522.12.137 (English issue)

Biography:

William McCleary

McCleary began trading from premises located at 31 Lower Ormond Quay in 1791 and by 1798 his business had become sufficiently successful to allow him to move to a larger shop located on Nassau Street. The street, which overlooked College Green, was one of Dublin’s most fashionable shopping areas and home to several shops selling luxury goods such as jewellery, fine clothing and confectionary. 

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