C1802
 (1842)

The Right Hon. Charles Hope of Granton, When Lord Advocate of England

Portrait of Charles Hope, Lord Granton (1763–1851) Lord Advocate of England. After studying law at Edinburgh University he was admitted an advocate on 11 December 1784, and on 25 March 1786 was appointed a deputy advocate. On 20 November 1804, Hope was … Read Full Description

$A 110

In stock

S/N: ASOOP-253-LEGAL–228786
(DRW004)
Free Shipping

Within Australia

All orders ship free
within Australia

Rest of the World

Orders over A$300
ship free worldwide

See Shipping page for Terms & Conditions

Details

Full Title:

The Right Hon. Charles Hope of Granton, When Lord Advocate of England

Date:

C1802
 (1842)

Condition:

In good condition

Technique:

Etching

Image Size: 

83mm 
x 125mm
AUTHENTICITY
The Right Hon. Charles Hope of Granton, When Lord Advocate of England - Antique Print from 1802

Genuine antique
dated:

1842

Description:

Portrait of Charles Hope, Lord Granton (1763–1851) Lord Advocate of England.

After studying law at Edinburgh University he was admitted an advocate on 11 December 1784, and on 25 March 1786 was appointed a deputy advocate. On 20 November 1804, Hope was appointed an ordinary lord of session and lord justice clerk in the place of Sir David Rae, Lord Eskgrove, and assuming the title of Lord Granton took his seat on the bench on 6 December 1804. On 12 November 1811, he succeeded Robert Blair, Lord Avontoun as lord president of the court of session, being succeeded as lord justice clerk by David Boyle, Lord Boyle. In 1820, he presided at the special commission for the trial of high treason at Glasgow, and on 17 August 1822 was admitted to the privy council at Holyrood House. Upon the death of James Graham, 3rd Duke of Montrose, in December 1836, Hope became lord justice general, by virtue of 11 Geo. IV and 1 Wm. IV, cap. 69, sec. 18, by which it was enacted that ‘after the termination of the present existing interest’ that office should ‘devolve upon and remain united with the office of lord president of the court of session.’ Hope retired from the bench in the autumn of 1841.

Kay etched and sold his caricature portraits individually from 1784 until the 1820’s. These individually issued etchings were collected over many years by Hugh Paton and issued as, A series of original portraits and caricature etchings by the late John Kay.

John Kay (1742 - 1826)

Kay was a Scottish caricaturist and engraver. He was born near Dalkeith, where his father was a mason. At thirteen he was apprenticed to a barber, whom he served for six years. He then went to Edinburgh, where in 1771 he obtained the freedom of the city by joining the corporation of barber-surgeons. In 1784 he published his first caricature, of Laird Robertson. In 1785, induced by the favour which greeted certain attempts of his to etch in aquafortis, he took down his barber's pole and opened a small print shop in Parliament Close. There he continued to flourish, painting miniatures, and publishing at short intervals his sketches and caricatures of local celebrities and oddities, who abounded at that period in Edinburgh society. Kay's famous shop on the Royal Mile was destroyed during the Great Edinburgh Fire of November 1824.

View other items by John Kay

Choose currency

Exchange rates are only indicative. All orders will be processed in Australian dollars. The actual amount charged may vary depending on the exchange rate and conversion fees applied by your credit card issuer.

Login

Register

Search

The List

Join our exclusive mailing list for first access to new acquisitions and special offers.