C1814

The Two Veterans.

Rare satirical print by George Cruikshank of the Prince Regent and Bulcher drinking. Blucher raises his glass, behind him hangs a painting of him galloping in pursuit of the terrified Napoleon. The Regent tipsily tilts his chair, while steading himself with … Read Full Description

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Details

Full Title:

The Two Veterans.

Date:

C1814

Condition:

In good condition, with unfaded original hand colouring.

Technique:

Copper engraving with original hand colouring.

Image Size: 

230mm 
x 380mm

Paper Size: 

275mm 
x 432mm

Platemark Size: 

245mm 
x 190mm
AUTHENTICITY
The Two Veterans. - Antique Print from 1814

Genuine antique
dated:

1814

Description:

Rare satirical print by George Cruikshank of the Prince Regent and Bulcher drinking. Blucher raises his glass, behind him hangs a painting of him galloping in pursuit of the terrified Napoleon. The Regent tipsily tilts his chair, while steading himself with an outstretched leg  tilts the table, upsetting; a candelabra, decanter, large bowl of punch, which his private secretary Yarmouth leans over him, putting a hand on his shoulder and dips a ladle into the punch to fill the Regent’s extended glass. Above the Regent is a painting of Punch and his wife, fighting.

The verse below in two columns;
‘Hectora quern laudas, pro te pugnare juneto [sic, i.e. jubeto] [Hector to whom you praise, to combat command]
Militia est operis altera digna tuis. Ovid. [Is there another worthy of your work. Heroides xvii, 255 f.]

Oh! Wine is the thing to make veterans tell /Of their deeds and their triumphs—and punch does as well—/ As the R—t and B—r, that sober old pair,/ Fully prov’d  t’other night, when they supp’d—you know where,/ And good humour’dly bragged of the feats they’d been doing, /O’er exquisite punch of my Y—r—th’s own brewing./ ‘This’ diff’rence there was in the modes of their strife, / ‘One’ had fought with the ‘French’—t’other fought with his —/ “How I dress’d them!” said B—r, and fill’d up sublime—/ “I too,” says the P—e, “have dressed men in my time.” /’Bl.’ One morning at dawn—/ ‘Reg.’ Zounds, how early you fight! /I could never be ready ‘(hiccups) my’ things are so tight! /’Bl.’ I sent forward a few pioneers over night—/ ‘Reg.’ Ugly animals these are, in general, I hear—(‘hiccups’)/ The Q— you must know is ‘my’ chief pioneer.”/’Bl.’ The foe came to meet us—
‘Reg.’ There I manage better,/ The foe would meet ‘me’, but I’m d—n’d if I’ll let her./ ‘Bl.’ Pell Mell was the word—dash thro’ thick and thro’ thin.

‘Reg.’ C—l—n H— to a tittle!—how well we chime in!/ ‘Bl.’ For the fate of all Europe, the fate of men’s rights,/ We battl’d—/ ‘Reg.’ And I for the grand fete at White’s!/ ‘Bl.’ Though the ways, deep and dirty, delay’d our design—/ ‘Reg.’ Never talk of the dirt of ‘your’ ways, think of ‘mine’/ ‘Bl.’ And the balls hissing round—/ ‘Reg.’ Oh, those balls be ‘my’ lot,/ Where a good supper is, and the P—nc—ss is ‘not’./ And for hissing—why faith, I’ve so much ev’ry day,/ That my name, I expect in the true Royal way,/ Will descend to posterity, “George le Siffle!”/ ‘Bl.’ But we conquer’d, we conquer’d—blest hour of my life!/ ‘Reg.’ And blest moment of mine, when I conquer’d my w—./ Here the dialogue falter’d—he still strove to speak,/ And strong was the punch, and the R—t’s head weak;/ And the Marshal cried “Charge!” and the bumpers went round,/ Till the fat-toilet veteran sunk on the ground;/ And old Bl—ch—r triumphantly crow’d from his seat,/ To see one worthy Potentate more at his feet!

Printed on Balsiong watermarked paper dated 1813.

References:
Bills, M. The Art of Satire. London 2006:.
McPhee, C. Infinite Jest : Caricature and Satire from Leonardo to Levine. New York 2011:.
Robinson, R. Caricature and the Regency Crisis: An Irish Perspective.: Hector to whom you praise, to combat command.


Collections:
British Museum London: 1868,0808.12800

George Cruikshank (1792 - 1878)

Cruikshank was one of the most prolific illustrators and satirical artists working in England and often referred to as the 'modern Hogarth'. Born in London, a member of the Cruikshank family of caricaturists and artists. His father Isaac was a well-known engraver and caricaturist who taught him etching, watercolor, and drawing. In 1811 while George was still in his teens, he gained popular success with his series of political caricatures that he created for the periodical,The Scourge, a Monthly Expositor of Imposture and Folly. This publication lasted until 1816, during which time Cruikshank came to rival James Gillray, the leading English caricaturist of the preceding era. In fact, because their style was so similar as to be indistinguishable, Cruikshank was employed by Hannah Humphrey, James Gillray's publisher and landlady, to finish plates Gillray was too ill to complete. In the 1820's, Cruikshank began his book illustration period of his career with his most famous being for Charles Dickens's Sketches by Boz (1836) and Oliver Twist (1838). In the 1830's he began campaigning against the abuses of alcohol, especially gin. In 1847 he renounced all alcohol and became an enthusiastic supporter of the Temperance Society in Great Britain. Cruikshank produced a long series of pictures and illustrations, pictorial pamphlets and tracts for the Society. Cruikshank's crusade against the evils of alcohol culminated in The Worship of Bacchus,published by subscription and based on the artist's vast oil painting of the same name, now in the Tate Gallery in London. George conceived the idea for the painting during an 1859 weekly meeting of the Committee of the National Temperance League. He planned a "monumental painting depicting all phases of drunkenness, from beggar to lord and cradle to grave."He began the huge painting in 1860 and completed it in 1862.

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