C1710

Typus Orbis Terrarum.

Mapmaker:

Philipp Cluver (1580 - 1622)

Superb and rare miniature double-hemisphere world map decorated with the four continents shown in allegorical form, with examples of their animal life and inhabitants. Australia is named Jollandia Nova and the Great Southern Land is named Terra Australis Incognita. This … Read Full Description

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S/N: IEUG-050-WM–227328
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Details

Full Title:

Typus Orbis Terrarum.

Date:

C1710

Mapmaker:

Philipp Cluver (1580 - 1622)

Condition:

In good condition with folds as issued.

Technique:

Copper engraving hand coloured

Image Size: 

305mm 
x 160mm

Frame Size: 

625mm 
x 495mm
AUTHENTICITY
Typus Orbis Terrarum. - Antique Map from 1710

Genuine antique
dated:

1710

Description:

Superb and rare miniature double-hemisphere world map decorated with the four continents shown in allegorical form, with examples of their animal life and inhabitants. Australia is named Jollandia Nova and the Great Southern Land is named Terra Australis Incognita. This Cluver’s most elaborate miniature world map, the others do not contain the decorative embellishments surrounding the spheres.

At lower centre is the figure of Atlas condemned to holding up the skies for eternity.

From Cluver’s Introductionis en Universum Geographicus

Mapmaker:

Philipp Clüver (also Klüwer, Cluwer, or Cluvier, Latinized as Philippus Cluverius and Philippi Cluverii) (1580 – 31 December 1622) was an Early Modern German geographer and historian.

Clüver was born in Danzig (Gdańsk), in Royal Prussia, a province of the Kingdom of Poland. After spending some time at the Polish court of Sigismund III Vasa, he began the study of law at the University of Leiden (Dutch Republic), but soon he turned his attention to history and geography, which were then taught there by Joseph Scaliger. Clüver received science education from his father, who was Münzmeister at Danzig (coin master), but when Clüver went into different studies, his father stopped supporting his studies. He therefore travelled from Leiden across Hungary to Bohemia, where he did military service for a few years. While in Bohemia, he translated into Latin a defense by Baron Popel Lobkowitz, who was imprisoned. Upon his return to Leiden, he faced sanctions by the imperial (Habsburg) authorities for this, which however he could avoid with the help of his Leiden friends. Clüver also travelled in England, Scotland, and France. He did all travel on foot, finally returning to Leiden, where (after 1616) he received a regular pension from the university. He died in Leiden.

Clüver was an antiquary, who was given a special appointment at Leiden as geographer and put in charge of the university’s library, but his life’s project, it developed, was a general study of the geography of Antiquity, based not only on classical literary sources, but — and this was his contribution — supplemented by wide travels and local inspections. He became virtually the founder of historical geography. Clüver’s first work, in 1611, concerning the lower reaches of the Rhine and its tribal inhabitants in Roman times (Commentarius de tribus Rheni alveis, et ostiis; item. De Quinque populis quondam accolis; scilicet de Toxandris, Batavis, Caninefatibus, Frisiis, ac Marsacis) touched a source of national pride among the Seventeen Provinces, for the Dutch were enjoying a twelve years’ truce in their Eighty Years’ War of liberation. Clüver’s Germaniae antiquae libri tres (Leiden, 1616) depends on Tacitus and other Latin authors. A volume on the antiquities of Sicily, with notes on Sardinia and Corsica (Sicilia Antiqua cum minoribus insulis ei adjacentibus item Sardinia et Corsica), published at Leiden by Louis Elsevier in 1619, is a useful source, with many reference from writers of Antiquity and maps that are often detached and sold to map collectors. His Introductio in universam geographiam, totally 6 parts, (published posthumously from 1624) was the first comprehensive modern geography,[1] and became a standard geographical textbook. Clüver was also a prolific a writer on mathematical and theological subjects. He is remembered by collectors and historians of cartography for his edition of Ptolemy’s Geographia (based on Mercator’s edition of 1578) and for miniature atlases that were reprinted for most of the 17th century. Many of his maps were etched for him by Petrus Bertius.

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