C1731

Ulysses & his Companions avoid the charms of the Sirens.

The Sirens were sea-nymphs who had the power of charming by their song all who heard them, so that the unhappy mariners were irresistibly impelled to cast themselves into the sea to their destruction. Circe directed Ulysses to fill the … Read Full Description

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S/N: CECR-024-DEC–224631
(C119)
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Details

Full Title:

Ulysses & his Companions avoid the charms of the Sirens.

Date:

C1731

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Copper engraving.

Image Size: 

245mm 
x 345mm
AUTHENTICITY
Ulysses & his Companions avoid the charms of the Sirens. - Antique Print from 1731

Genuine antique
dated:

1731

Description:

The Sirens were sea-nymphs who had the power of charming by their song all who heard them, so that the unhappy mariners were irresistibly impelled to cast themselves into the sea to their destruction. Circe directed Ulysses to fill the ears of his seamen with wax, so that they should not hear the strain and to cause himself to be bound to the mast, and his people to be strictly enjoined, whatever he might say or do, by no means to release him till they should have passed the Sirens’ island. Ulysses obeyed these directions. He filled the ears of his people with wax, and suffered them to bind him with cords firmly to the mast. As they approached the Sirens’ island, the sea was calm, and over the waters came the notes of music so ravishing and attractive that Ulysses struggled to get loose, and by cries and signs to his people begged to be released but they, obedient to his previous orders, sprang forward and bound him still faster. They held on their course, and the music grew fainter till it ceased to be heard, when with joy Ulysses gave his companions the signal to unseal their ears, and they relieved him from his bonds.

Bernard Picart (1673 - 1733)

Picart was a French artist and engraver. He was born in Paris and died in Amsterdam. He moved to Antwerp in 1696, and spent a year in Amsterdam before returning to France at the end of 1698. After his wife died in 1708, he moved to Amsterdam in 1711 (later being joined by his father), where he became a Protestant His most famous work is Cérémonies et coutumes religieuses de tous les peuples du monde. Although Picart had never left Europe, he relied on accounts by those who had and had access to a collection of Indian sculpture.

View other items by Bernard Picart

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