C1827

View of the Entrance of Port Macquarie. View up the River Hastings. At its junction with Kings River.

From Narrative of a Survey Volume 1 by Phillip Parker King May 10. The next morning we anchored off Port Macquarie and whilst the Lady Nelson was beating up to an anchorage Lieutenant Oxley accompanied me in the whale-boat to … Read Full Description

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S/N: NC-1827-KING-201AB–221292
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Full Title:

View of the Entrance of Port Macquarie. View up the River Hastings. At its junction with Kings River.

Date:

C1827

Condition:

In good condition

Technique:

Image Size: 

135mm 
x 225mm
AUTHENTICITY
View of the Entrance of Port Macquarie. View up the River Hastings. At its junction with Kings River. - Antique Print from 1827

Genuine antique
dated:

1827

Description:

From Narrative of a Survey Volume 1 by Phillip Parker King May 10. The next morning we anchored off Port Macquarie and whilst the Lady Nelson was beating up to an anchorage Lieutenant Oxley accompanied me in the whale-boat to examine the entrance. May 14. And on the 14th Lieutenant Oxley and Mr. Roe accompanied me in one of our boats upon the examination of the river. After reaching our former station on the south bank we proceeded up the long reach towards Black-man Point, on which a tribe of natives were collected: the river is here divided into two streams we followed that which trended to the westward as it appeared to be the most considerable. At the end of the next reach the river is again divided into two branches, and as the southernmost was found upon trial to be the shoalest, the other was followed. On our left was a small contracted arm, which probably communicates with the lagoon on Rawdon Island here we landed to examine the trees which so thickly and beautifully cover both banks: several sorts of large growth were noticed, among which was a tree of the trichillieae, natural order Jussieu (Trichillia glandulosa), which the colonists have flattered with the name of rosewood, and a ficus of gigantic growth, both of which are very abundant. We landed at Point Elizabeth and walked a mile back through a fine open country, well timbered and richly clothed with luxuriant grass and apparently much frequented by kangaroos. From the edge of the bank Mount Cairncross, a remarkable round-topped hill which is conspicuously seen from the coast over the entrance of the port,* appeared over the next reach, and formed a rich picturesque back-ground for the view.

Phillip Parker King (1791 - 1856)

Phillip Parker King (1791–1856) King was a naval officer, hydrographer and company manager, son of Philip Gidley King. Phillip sailed for England with his parents in October 1796 in the Britannia. When his father left England in November 1799 to become governor of New South Wales, his sister Maria was left in the care of Mrs Samuel Enderby, and Phillip was placed under the tuition of Rev. S. Burford in Essex. In 1802 he was nominated to the Portsmouth Naval Academy. In November 1807 he entered the navy in the Diana and became a midshipman serving for six years in the North Sea, the Bay of Biscay and the Mediterranean, being promoted master's mate in 1810 and lieutenant in February 1814.

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