C1825

Vue Du Camp De L’Uranie, Dans La Baie Francaise Des Iles Malouines, apres le naufrage de la Corvette.

Rare engraved view of the wrecked Uranie, in the Falkland Island with the crew evacuating collections off the vessel and the camp on shore . The Uranie safely rounded Cape Horn on 6 February 1820 and anchored in the Bay … Read Full Description

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S/N: FVADM-SAM-109–214686
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Details

Full Title:

Vue Du Camp De L’Uranie, Dans La Baie Francaise Des Iles Malouines, apres le naufrage de la Corvette.

Date:

C1825

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Hand coloured stipple engraving.

Image Size: 

272mm 
x 192mm

Paper Size: 

380mm 
x 313mm
AUTHENTICITY
Vue Du Camp De L'Uranie, Dans La Baie Francaise Des Iles Malouines, apres le naufrage de la Corvette. - Antique View from 1825

Genuine antique
dated:

1825

Description:

Rare engraved view of the wrecked Uranie, in the Falkland Island with the crew evacuating collections off the vessel and the camp on shore .

The Uranie safely rounded Cape Horn on 6 February 1820 and anchored in the Bay of Good Success (coast of Argentina) only to be forced out to sea by a storm before anyone could go ashore. After the storm subsided, the Uranie had been pushed too far to the north to warrant returning to the Bay of Good Success, so Freycinet decided to continue to the Falklands to reconnoitre the eastern-most island of the group, then called Ile Conti. He anchored in the Baie Française because of the apparent existence of animals that could be hunted for food and because he believed the islands to be inhabited and that he would be able to get news from France. “We considered ourselves to have reached the end of our long voyage” wrote Freycinet, “We had just entered the Atlantic and almost completed our circumnavigation. We indulged in the sweet hope that we would soon see our dear homeland and pay it homage with our numerous studies and collections that we had gathered. In short, we congratulated ourselves for our success and we were proud of having completed such a long expedition without any serious misfortunes or damage to the vessel.

The Uranie entered the Baie Française on a clear day with a favourable breeze. In spite of the usual precautions taken when approaching unfamiliar shores, the ship hit a submerged rock and suddenly stopped with a violent jolt. Pieces of wood floating in the water suggested that a serious hole had been pierced in the hull. Freycinet immediately ordered the crew to the pumps, but the rising water in the hold made him realise that he would have to run the Uranie aground in order to save the crew and collections. While attempting to reach a sandy shore inside the bay, night fell and the breeze dropped. To run the Uranie into the steep rocky shore would have resulted in certain loss of life. “More unfortunate even than La Pérouse’s crew,” wrote Freycinet, “nobody would ever have known our fate, everything would have been swallowed by the deep sea.” The crew manned the pumps continuously, singing to maintain their spirits and stave off their fatigue. At 3 o’clock on the morning of 15 February, 1820, the Uranie was run aground on the south side of the bay.

Towards the end of March, 1820, an American ship the Mercury came into the Baie Française to do repairs on its way to the Pacific. Freycinet managed to negotiate a passage for the crew of the Uranie on board the Mercury which weighed anchor on 27 April and headed towards Montevideo. During the passage, Freycinet purchased the Mercury and renamed her the Physicienne.

From Freycinet, L. Voyage autour du monde, entrepris par ordre du Roi.. Paris.

 

Collections:
State Library of Western Australia:

J. Alphonse Pellion (1796 - 1868)

Pellion was a topographical painter, naval draughtsman and midshipman aboard l'Uranie under the command of Louis de Freycinet during the voyages of 1817-1820. Pellion made many sketches in NSW, including views of Cox's Pass and Cox's River and portraits of the local aborigines. In 1819, Governor of New South Wales, Lachlan Macquarie, invited the French explorer Baudin to cross the Blue Mountains on a new road, with Pellion accompanying him.

View other items by J. Alphonse Pellion

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