C1909

Quay Montebello

Artist:

Herman Armour Webster (1878 - 1970)

Fine etching by the American etcher, Herman Armour Webster (1878-1970) of Rue du Petit-Pont, Quay Montebello, Paris. It was called “rue Neuve” in 1230 and is one of the oldest roads in Paris.

$A 300

In stock

S/N: PM-OS-1909-WEBS–225313
(DRW 05)
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Details

Full Title:

Quay Montebello

Date:

C1909

Artist:

Herman Armour Webster (1878 - 1970)

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Original etching signed in pencil lower right.

Image Size: 

135mm 
x 200mm

Paper Size: 

212mm 
x 270mm
AUTHENTICITY
Quay Montebello - Antique View from 1909

Genuine antique
dated:

1909

Description:

Fine etching by the American etcher, Herman Armour Webster (1878-1970) of Rue du Petit-Pont, Quay Montebello, Paris. It was called “rue Neuve” in 1230 and is one of the oldest roads in Paris.

Artist:

Herman Armour Webster (1878-1970)
Webster was born in New York City on April 6, 1878. His father, George Huntington Webster was a partner in the New York division of the Armour business interests of Chicago; and it was as a sign of appreciation and respect that he named his child after his benefactors. The family later moved to Chicago, where Herman Webster grew up, after which he returned east to attend St. Paul’s School in Concord, New Hampshire. He went on to The Sheffield Scientific School at Yale University, Class of 1900, where he edited and contributed illustrations to campus humor magazine The Yale Record. Upon graduation he sailed to Europe to attend the 1900 Universal Exposition in Paris.

In Paris, he took art lessons from the Serbian muralist Alphonse Mucha (1860 – 1939). Over the next two years Webster would reside in Paris; contend with a bout of typhoid fever in Berlin; trek the Russian steppes on the Trans-Siberian Railway; puzzle over the mysteries of the Orient while visiting Beijing, Nagasaki, Yokohama, and Tokyo; and ultimately return home via the Pacific. He reached Chicago just before Christmas, 1901, and revealed to his family a desire to pursue the artist’s life in Paris.  

Upon his return to Paris, Webster enrolled at the Académie Julian, where he joined the studio of Jean-Paul Laurens (1838 – 1921), the Paris academician and professor at the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts. It was there that Webster met Donald Shaw MacLaughlan (1876 – 1938), a Canadian artist already established as a significant presence in the Paris art scene. MacLaughlan was a practiced printmaker of considerable skill, as well as a teacher, and it was he who first taught Webster the craft of etching. 

In 1914 Webster enlisted in the American Ambulance Corps in support of the Allied Forces during World War I,and served through 1917, when he was exposed to militarized gas. His eyesight was severely impaired forcing him to abandon the close, detailed work of etching.

Webster died in Paris in 1970.

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