C1873

Tasmanian Charcoal Iron Company’s Mine

Large colonial engraving depicting charcoal mining in Tasmania.  The Tasmanian Charcoal Iron Company operated between 1871 and 1874. In October 1867, under the pseudonym “E.H.”, Enoch Hughes wrote the first of a series of letters to newspapers extolling Newcastle, N.S.W. as … Read Full Description

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S/N: IAN-TC-730909156–234532
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Details

Full Title:

Tasmanian Charcoal Iron Company’s Mine

Date:

C1873

Condition:

Small section of lower left margin reinstated and a small repaired tear at right sheet edge, light spotting, otherwise in good condition.

Technique:

Hand coloured engraving.

Image Size: 

238mm 
x 360mm

Paper Size: 

265mm 
x 395mm
AUTHENTICITY
Tasmanian Charcoal Iron Company's Mine - Antique Print from 1873

Genuine antique
dated:

1873

Description:

Large colonial engraving depicting charcoal mining in Tasmania. 

The Tasmanian Charcoal Iron Company operated between 1871 and 1874.

In October 1867, under the pseudonym “E.H.”, Enoch Hughes wrote the first of a series of letters to newspapers extolling Newcastle, N.S.W. as a location for an iron works, complete with estimates of production costs.A later letter written by Hughes on the same theme, in May 1872, influenced the formation of a private company, the Tasmanian Charcoal Iron Company, to mine and smelt iron ore in Northern Tasmania.  The two main proponents of the venture, two Tasmanians, James Reid Scott (a local politician) and Thomas Cook Just (a newspaper proprietor and entrepreneur), inspected the iron ore deposit during May 1871. They and three others then each took up adjacent leases of 80 acres—the maximum allowed to one party—together controlling 400 acres that included the ore deposit. Combining with “one or two leading commercial men in Melbourne, represented by Messrs. Lempriere—old Tasmanian residents”, they formed the Tasmanian Charcoal Iron Company. The share capital was fixed at £80,000, in 40,000 shares of £2 each, every share being paid up to £1, with the remaining amount. being left at call

1. PORT LEMPRIERE, SHOWING THE COMPANY’S JETTY.
2. IRON ORE DEPOSIT ON MOUNT VULCAN.
3. CUTTING THROUGH RED OXIDE OF IRON ON MOUNT VULCAN.
4. TRAMWAY LEADING TO THE IRON MINES.

From the original edition of the Illustrated Australian News.|

Collections:
State Library of Victoria: 10381/241686

Samuel Calvert (1828 - 1913)

Samuel Calvert (1828-1913) English painter and engraver who moved to Adelaide after his older brothers John and William migrated to South Australia in 1843. By 1850 Calvert had set up on his own account in King William Street then then moved to Melbourne as an engraver in 1853. He was a prolific and left a large body of work.

View other items by Samuel Calvert

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