C1872

The Intercolonial Champion Gig Race at Sydney, Balmain Regatta.

Scarce colonial engraving of the 1872 intercolonial champion gig race, in the Balmain Regatta. The Intercolonial Champion Gig Race was the principal event of the Balmain Regatta. It was the fourth race in the Regatta. Contemporary account of the event: … Read Full Description

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S/N: IAN-NS-721205241–436471
(B005)
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Details

Full Title:

The Intercolonial Champion Gig Race at Sydney, Balmain Regatta.

Date:

C1872

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Hand coloured engraving.

Image Size: 

227mm 
x 164mm
AUTHENTICITY
The Intercolonial Champion Gig Race at Sydney, Balmain Regatta. - Antique View from 1872

Genuine antique
dated:

1872

Description:

Scarce colonial engraving of the 1872 intercolonial champion gig race, in the Balmain Regatta.

The Intercolonial Champion Gig Race was the principal event of the Balmain Regatta. It was the fourth race in the Regatta.

Contemporary account of the event:
For all bona fide amateurs-that is those who do not gain their living by manual labour, pulling four oars in string test gigs not exceeding 42 feet overall, with coxswains Prizes were offered on the following conditions -NSW alone represented, £50, NSW and another colony, £100, NSW and two or more colonies, £130 for the first prize, and a second prize of £20. The course from Pyrmont Bridge round the Vernon, and back to the flagship. Entrance, £4 4s.

Sydney Rowing Club representative Crew:  De B Deloitte, G H. Fitzhardinge, R.A. Clarke, M.A.H. Fltzhardinge, R.B. Hays, J.G. Blaxland, J. Miller,
Victoria representative Crew:  J G rice, M. L. C Tender, L. W. Bell, P. J. Carter, W. Greenland.

There was the greatest excitement over this race, but very little betting took place, the odds being in favour of the representative crew, No I £200 to £20 were laid in favour of Sydney the night before the race No 1 were the first to show up, and, upon pulling to the starting point, were received with three cheers, which were repeated as the Melbourne men came out, followed by No 2 The Melbourne crew had the inner position near Balmain, No 2 being in the centre and No 1 on the Sydney side. The boats jumped away simultaneously to a splendid start, the Victorians going away with the lead at a good bat, followed by No 1 and 2 in close company. The Victorians held a lead of half a length until passing the A.S.N Co’s works, where No 1 came up and passed them, taking a lead at Balmain Point of two lengths, with No 2 a similar distance astern of the Victorian boat. Opposite the flagship No I took the Victorians’ water, having increased the lead to four lengths, and No 2 began steadily to come up. After clearing the point No 2 went up and led the Victorians by a quarter of a length, the latter pulling with a great deal of pluck, though rather stiffly and their quick stroke beginning to tell. Crossing Water View Bay, No 1 had increased the lead to fully 10 lengths and No 2 had also forged ahead and left the Victorians two lengths astern. From this point the race was virtually over. After leaving Long Nose enroute to the Vernon, the representative crew increased the gap, and No 2 went after them, Victoria appearing pretty well done up, with the exception of the stroke (Carter) who pulled with great determination. Bow was evidently touched in the wind, and laboured, and had enough of it. Rounding the training ship Vernon, moored off Biloela, the boys, who had swarmed the shrouds, gave three hearty cheers to the competing crews. On the way back to Long Nose the Victorians put on a spurt, and decreased the distance between their boat and No 2, but this advantage was only temporary, as they quickly fell back into their old position Passing Long Nose the representative crew were something within a quarter of a mile in front, and passed the Flagship about 3 1/2 minutes ahead of No 2 crew, who in their turn got to the winning post a minute and a half before the Victorians. The official time was not taken, but the race was pulled, in about 28 1/ minutes.

From the original edition of the Illustrated Australian News. 

Collections:
University Queensland: Identifier 991000982479703131
State Library Victoria: PCINF ; IAN 05-12-72 P.241
National Library Australia: Bib ID 2495305
State Library New South Wales: CALL NUMBERS F079/55, TN380
Royal Geographic Society SA: RGS Special Coll. 079.94 I29d

References:
Syme, E. & D, Illustrated Australian News. ISSN 2208-5386.

Samuel Calvert (1828 - 1913)

Samuel Calvert (1828-1913) English painter and engraver who moved to Adelaide after his older brothers John and William migrated to South Australia in 1843. By 1850 Calvert had set up on his own account in King William Street then then moved to Melbourne as an engraver in 1853. He was a prolific and left a large body of work.

View other items by Samuel Calvert

Albert Charles Cooke (1836 - 1902)

Cooke was a painter, engraver, draughtsman and illustrator. Throughout his career he worked for many of the Illustrated newspapers, such as the Illustrated Sydney News, Illustrated Australian News, The Australasian Sketcher and The Leader. He was also well known for a series of birds eye views of a number of Australian cities and towns.

View other items by Albert Charles Cooke

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