C1814

John Bull Mad with Joy! or, the First of August 1814.

Rare caricature of a scene in St. James’s Park with the Prince  who was to become the King in 1830 (William the IV) advancing towards John Bull, holding out a large paper. John Bull reads it, capering wildly, waving his wig … Read Full Description

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Details

Full Title:

John Bull Mad with Joy! or, the First of August 1814.

Date:

C1814

Condition:

In good condition, with unfaded original hand colouriing.

Technique:

Copper engraving with original hand colouring.

Image Size: 

350mm 
x 240mm

Paper Size: 

450mm 
x 268mm
AUTHENTICITY
John Bull Mad with Joy! or, the First of August 1814. - Antique Print from 1814

Genuine antique
dated:

1814

Description:

Rare caricature of a scene in St. James’s Park with the Prince  who was to become the King in 1830 (William the IV) advancing towards John Bull, holding out a large paper. John Bull reads it, capering wildly, waving his wig and a toy gibbet from which hangs a bunch of three little men. Behind him is a tree decorated with fairy lights and behind the Prince can be seen the an end of the Chinese Bridge over the Canal, with one side of the Pagoda. The Prince, though obese, is scarcely caricatured, and is plainly dressed, wearing a round hat. He has a small whisker, and a small tail of powdered hair. Under his right arm is a large roll of papers, inscribed Bill [of F]are. The paper he displays is inscribed: Grand National Jubilee for the Peace of 1814—Bill of Fare Hyde Park a grand Fair Mess Gyngell— Richardson Scowton and Punches Shews a grand sea Fight upon the Serpentine. Fireworks in Kensington Gardens—plenty of Gin and Beer—St James Park— a Ballon—with two illuminated to succeed. Chinese Bridge and Pagoda Boat race on the Canal—fire works—plenty of Port—Sherry Claret champaine &c &c &c Green Park Castle and Temple Fire Works and Royal Booth! Lords . . .’

Speech balloon top left;     Ah, ha! Johnny, I knew you’d be delighted!
Speech balloon top right; Huzza for the Prince of Princes! Damn the lying London Papers! may W_d be drown’d in one of the Buts! and J_y be choaked with his long speeches! here I have your enemies as they should be! I shall stick this in my corn field to frighten the crows! So Huzza again and again for the Prince of Princes.

 

 

References:
Bills, M. The Art of Satire. London 2006: P.153-155.
McPhee, C. Infinite Jest : Caricature and Satire from Leonardo to Levine. New York 2011 ::.
Robinson, R. Caricature and the Regency Crisis: An Irish Perspective ::.
Mackenzie, I. British Prints Dictionary and Price Guide. Suffolk 1987 ::.


Collections:
British Museum London: 1868,0808.8167

Charles Williams (1790 - 1830)

Williams was a British caricaturist, etcher and illustrator. He was the main caricaturist between 1799 and 1815 for the London publisher S. W. Fores. In his earlier works, Williams used the pseudonyms Ansell or Argus; with George Cruikshank and others he illustrated, The Every-Day Book by William Hone. Williams was the first of many who caricatured the 1st Duke of Wellington, publishing a print of him in September 1808, during the Peninsular War, in which the Duke cuts off the pigtail of French general Jean-Andoche Junot, defeated at the Battle of Vimeiro. Almost all of his prints are anonymous. He worked for a number of publishers simultaneously, including; Fores, W. Holland, E. Walker, ,the Knight family and Tegg. Pseudonyms: Ansell, Argus, C. Lamb, Timothy Squib, Tom Truelove,

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William Holland (1757 - 1815)

William Holland (1757-1815) Was one of the leading London print sellers and publishers who bbegan selling prints in at 66 Drury Lane in 1782. He move to new premises at 50 Oxford Street in 1788 where he charged 1s for admittance to his 'Museum of Graphic Genius'. Holland's successful business grew and his print list included works by; Frederick George Byron, George Murgatroyd Woodward, John Nixon, James Gillray and Thomas Rowlandson. A radical, he was prosecuted in 1793 on charges of seditious libel for selling a copy of Thomas Paine's Letter Addressed to the Addressers[ and imprisoned in Newgate Prison. Pseudonyms: Jacob Douce, Paddy Whack (c.1787-91) Addresses: 66 Drury Lane (by July 1783 - end of 1786) 50 Oxford Street, London (end 1786- end 1802) 11 Cockspur Street, opposite Pall Mall, London (end 1802-15)

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