C1726

1. Boreels Eylanden, 2. Storm bay, 3. Zuyd Caep, 4. Tasmans Eyland

First printed map, solely devoted to Tasmania from the first complete account of Abel Tasman’s two voyages to Australia in 1642-43. The map shows Tasman’s two ships, the Heemskerck and Zeehaen, and the portion of the coast that he discovered on … Read Full Description

$A 1,500

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S/N: AM-TAS-VOENO-050–184110
(C027)
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Details

Full Title:

1. Boreels Eylanden, 2. Storm bay, 3. Zuyd Caep, 4. Tasmans Eyland

Date:

C1726

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Copper engraving.

Image Size: 

160mm 
x 135mm

Paper Size: 

202mm 
x 317mm
AUTHENTICITY
1. Boreels Eylanden, 2. Storm bay, 3. Zuyd Caep, 4. Tasmans Eyland - Antique Map from 1726

Genuine antique
dated:

1726

Description:

First printed map, solely devoted to Tasmania from the first complete account of Abel Tasman’s two voyages to Australia in 1642-43. The map shows Tasman’s two ships, the Heemskerck and Zeehaen, and the portion of the coast that he discovered on November 1642 .

The map includes numbers that are listed below the map;
1. Boreels Eylanden, present day Friars and Bruny Islands on the east side of Storm Bay as they passed up the D’Entrecasteaux Channel.
2. Storm Bay, Frederick Henry Bay.
3. Zuyd Caep, Cape Pillar
4. Tasmans Eyland, Tasman Island which both ships passed on Nov. 30 and Dec. 1 before sailing up the east coast of Tasmania.

On 24 November 1642, Tasman had reached and sighted the west coast of Tasmania, north of Macquarie Harbour. He named his discovery Van Diemen’s Land, after Antonio van Diemen, Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies. Proceeding south, Tasman skirted the southern end of Tasmania and turned north-east. He then tried to work his two ships into Adventure Bay on the east coast of South Bruny Island, where he was blown out to sea by a storm. This area he named Storm Bay. Two days later, on 1 December, Tasman anchored to the north of Cape Frederick Hendrick just north of the Forestier Peninsula. On 2 December, two ship’s boats under the command of the Pilot, Major Visscher, rowed through the Marion Narrows into Blackman Bay, and across the west to the outflow of Boomer Creek where they gathered some edible “greens”. Tasman named Frederick Hendrik Bay, which included the present North Bay, Marion Bay and the inlet Blackman Bay (the name Frederick Henry Bay was mistakenly transferred to its present location by Marion Dufresne in 1772). The next day, an attempt was made to land in North Bay. However, because the sea was too rough, the carpenter swam through the surf and planted the Dutch flag. Tasman then claimed formal possession of the land, on 3 December 1642. For two more days, he continued to follow the east coast northward to see how far it went. When the land veered to the north-west at Eddystone Point, he tried to keep in with it but his ships were suddenly hit by the Roaring Forties howling through Bass Strait.

From Francois Valentyn,  Oud en Nieuw Oost-Indien, vervattende een naaukeurige en uitvoerige verhandelinge van Nederlands Mogentheyd in die gewesten, benevens eene wydlustige beschryving der Moluccos, Amboina, Banda, Timor, en Solor, Java . Suratte . Choromandel, Pegu, Arracan, Bengale, Mocha, Persien, Malacca, Sumatra, Ceylon, Malabar, Celebes of Macassar, China, Japan, Tayouan of Formosa, Tonkin, Cambodia, Siam, Borneo, Bali, Kaap de Hoede Hoop en van Mauritius, Amsterdam.  1724-1726

References:
Tooley, Mapping of Australia: 1274, p.158, 432, p.348
Schilder,
Collections:
National Library Australia: 1546919
State Library NSW: Reference code (AuSN)b17267997-61slnsw_inst

Francois Valentyn (1656 - 1727)

Valentyn studied theology and travelled twice to the East Indies in the employ of the VOC, firstly as a Calvinist minister on the spice island of Amboina (1686-1694) and then to Java (1706) and again Amboina (1707-1713). In the preparation of his historical account of the VOC in the East, Valentyn was given privileged access to the secret archives of the company, enabling him to provide detailed information on previous Dutch voyages to the Indies, including those of Abel Tasman.

View other items by Francois Valentyn

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