C1711
 (1725)

A Map of the World Corrected from the Observations

Important and rare, large scale double hemisphere world map on two sheets, by John Senex. Superbly decorated, with a large title cartouche surrounded by allegorical representations of the continents, wind directions and Halley’s magnetic variations indicated by lines. In the … Read Full Description

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S/N: RLAR-008-WM-1725-SENEX–226340
(R005)
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Details

Full Title:

A Map of the World Corrected from the Observations

Date:

C1711
 (1725)

Condition:

Minor creasing, otherwise in good condition, with centre fold as issued.

Technique:

Copper engraving with original hand colouring

Image Size: 

1083mm 
x 590mm

Paper Size: 

1100mm 
x 683mm
AUTHENTICITY
A Map of the World Corrected from the Observations - Antique Map from 1711

Genuine antique
dated:

1725

Description:

Important and rare, large scale double hemisphere world map on two sheets, by John Senex.

Superbly decorated, with a large title cartouche surrounded by allegorical representations of the continents, wind directions and Halley’s magnetic variations indicated by lines. In the corners are extensive texts by Sir Isaac Newton on the theories of tides, extracted from Principia Mathematica and Edmond Halley’s accounts of the Trade Winds and Monsoons from the Philosphical Transactions of the Royal Society.

John Senex first published this map with his partner John Maxwell in 1711 and then issued this revised edition in 1725, identified by the removal of John Maxwell’s name, although still faintly visible. Subsequent later issues are identified by the addition of the initials F.R.G. after Senex’s name (Fellow of the Royal Society which he had become a member of in 1728). California is shown as a peninsula rather than an island.

Australia is named New Holland and includes the following Dutch discoveries: Hartogh 1616, van Leeuwin 1622, Carstensz 1623, Nuyts 1627, De Wit 1628 and Tasman 1642-1644. Surprisingly there is no evidence of Dampier’s visit to Shark Bay in 1699, although this information would have been widely known in English mapmaking circles in London at the time. In the centre of the map is a note taken from Nicholaes Witsen’s paper Observations in New Holland, presented to the Philosophical Society in 1698 ‘the soil of Hollandia Nova is barren and desart no fresh but some salt water rivers, no fourfooted Beasts except an Amphibious one of as big as a dog, Rats as great as Cats; also black Swans and Parots; the Natives are Black and go naked; the Coast is low, foul and rocky, the inland parts high, vast numbers of troublesome Flies.’

Witsen was an extremely knowledgeable and well connected Dutch statesman and mayor of Amsterdam thirteen times and became administrator of the VOC from 1693. In 1689 he was Ambassador Extraordinary to the English court and became a Fellow of the Royal Society.

References:

Sheldon, #47, p.56, Royal Society January 1, 1698 Vol 20 p.361-362, Wagner, p.497, 522; Whitfield p.110 ill.p.111.

 The full extract of Nicholaes Witsen’s paper;

‘In a voyage to the south land called Hollandia Nova it has been discovered that the soil of this country is very barren and like a desert no fresh water rivers have been found but some of salt water no quadrupeds except one as large as a dog with long ears that lives in the water as well as on the land Black swans parrots and many sea cows were found there Our people had seen but 12 of the natives all black and naked but so terrified that it was impossible to bring them to a conversation or a meeting they lodge themselves as the Hottentots do in pavilions made of small branches of trees By might our people saw fires all over the country but when they drew near the natives were fled The coast is very low but the country far from the sea is high Upon the islands near the coast have been seen rats as large as cats in great numbers all which had a kind of a bag or purse hanging from the throat upon the breast downwards There were found many sweet scented trees out of the wood of which is to be drawn oil smelling like a rose but for the rest they are small mean trees There were also found some birds nests of a prodigious size so that 6 men could not by stretching out their arms encompass one of them but the fowls were not to be found There was great store of oysters lobsters and crabs as also of strange sorts of fish There were also millions of flies which were very troublesome They saw a great many footsteps of men and children but all of an ordinary size The coast is very foul and full of rocks.’

John Senex (1690 - 1740)

Born in Ludlow in 1678, then apprenticed to the London bookseller, Robert Clavell, in 1695. Clavell was Master of the Stationers’ Company in 1698. At the end of his apprenticeship in 1702 he begins publishing on his own account. Little is known of his professional life other than that all are of his maps are of the highest standard.

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