C1900
 (1915)

[AUSTRALIA-WA] Ashburton Road Surveyed by Commander J.W. Combe, R.N.

Rare large hydrographic chart of Onslow, on the Pilbara coast of Western Australia, surveyed by Commander J.W. Combe. on H.M. Penquin, 1899. First issued on 14th December, 1900, new edition 1st April, 1915. Onslow was gazetted on 26 October 1885 as … Read Full Description

$A 650

S/N: HYDRO-3152-WA-0015XX–378893
(MD-16)
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Details

Full Title:

[AUSTRALIA-WA] Ashburton Road Surveyed by Commander J.W. Combe, R.N.

Date:

C1900
 (1915)

Engraver:

Davies & Co. 

Condition:

In good condition, with centre fold as issued. On original linen backing.

Technique:

Engraving.

Image Size: 

665mm 
x 840mm

Paper Size: 

707mm 
x 867mm
AUTHENTICITY
[AUSTRALIA-WA] Ashburton Road Surveyed by Commander J.W. Combe, R.N. - Antique Map from 1900

Genuine antique
dated:

1915

Description:

Rare large hydrographic chart of Onslow, on the Pilbara coast of Western Australia, surveyed by Commander J.W. Combe. on H.M. Penquin, 1899. First issued on 14th December, 1900, new edition 1st April, 1915. Onslow was gazetted on 26 October 1885 as a town to serve the port at Ashburton Roads, at the mouth of the Ashburton River, exporting wool from sheep stations of the Pilbara hinterland. It was named after the then Chief Justice of Western Australia, Sir Alexander Onslow (1842–1908).

Collections:
Not in Trove

 

 

 

Hydrographic charting of Australia History ( - )

Naval policy dictated that Admiralty charts be destroyed when superseded to avoid navigational error. It was during Rear Admiral John Washington’s period as the Admiralty’s hydrographer, 1855-1863, that a series of agreements were drawn up with the Australian colonies. These agreements provided boats and crews for use by officers lent from the Royal Navy to chart the coasts and shoal waters in the approaches to the rapidly developing towns, communication with which was seriously hampered by the the frequency of shipwrecks. It had been the discovery of gold and the consequent rush of miners and emigrants from not only England but California that added greatly the numbers of ships sailing to Australia’s east coast. This led to numerous petitions being made to Her Majesty’s Government to chart the eastern approaches to Australia to make for safer passage for shipping.

View other items by Hydrographic charting of Australia History

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