C1609

Ins. Ceilan quae incolis Tenarisin

A squarer representation of the Ceylon which was used in many of the Dutch produced atlases of the period. Decorated compass roses and galleons in the sea area. KOEMAN: ME 100 A. Gerardus Mercator /dʒɨˈrɑrdəs mərˈkeɪtər/ (born 5 March 1512 … Read Full Description

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S/N: ASI-CEY-1609-MERC–199178
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Details

Full Title:

Ins. Ceilan quae incolis Tenarisin

Date:

C1609

Condition:

In good condition, centre fold as issued.

Technique:

Copper engraving with original hand colouring

Image Size: 

500mm 
x 345mm
AUTHENTICITY
Ins. Ceilan quae incolis Tenarisin - Antique Print from 1609

Genuine antique
dated:

1609

Description:

A squarer representation of the Ceylon which was used in many of the Dutch produced atlases of the period. Decorated compass roses and galleons in the sea area.

KOEMAN: ME 100 A.

Gerardus Mercator /dʒɨˈrɑrdəs mərˈkeɪtər/ (born 5 March 1512 in Rupelmonde, County of Flandria, Belgica Regia, died 2 December 1594 in Duisburg, United Duchies of Jülich-Cleves-Berg, (modern-day Germany)) was a Belgian cartographer, philosopher and mathematician.

Gerard Mercator (1512 - 1594)

Mercator was one of the most important and influential of c.16th map makers. A geographer, cosmographer and is best known for creating the 1569 world map based on a new projection (named after him) which represented sailing courses of constant bearing (rhumb lines) as straight lines. His knowledge of geography came from his library of over one thousand books and maps, from travellers and from his vast correspondence (in six languages) with other scholars, statesmen, travellers, merchants and seamen. Mercator's early maps were in large formats suitable for wall mounting but in the second half of his life, he produced over 100 new regional maps in a smaller format suitable for binding into his Atlas of 1595. This was the first appearance of the word Atlas in reference to a book of maps.

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