C1862

Melbourne Hospital.

Early engraved view of the original Melbourne Hospital Building. On 1 March 1841, a group of influential citizens, headed by Charles La Trobe, Superintendent of the Port Phillip District, who later became the hospital’s President in 1847 and 1850-51, called … Read Full Description

$A 195

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S/N: VILL-VM-0215–216537
(C051)
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Details

Full Title:

Melbourne Hospital.

Date:

C1862

Artist:

Unknown

Engraver:

Arthur Wilmore 
(1814 – 
1888)

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Hand coloured engraving.

Image Size: 

170mm 
x 110mm

Paper Size: 

272mm 
x 207mm
AUTHENTICITY
Melbourne Hospital. - Antique Print from 1862

Genuine antique
dated:

1862

Description:

Early engraved view of the original Melbourne Hospital Building.

On 1 March 1841, a group of influential citizens, headed by Charles La Trobe, Superintendent of the Port Phillip District, who later became the hospital’s President in 1847 and 1850-51, called for a public meeting to discuss the urgent need for an enlarged public hospital. At this meeting a provisional committee was formed, with the aim to raise  ‎£800 for a building fund. A year later only  ‎£300 had been collected and in 1845, after two previous unsuccessful applications, the Committee was able to claim a Government subsidy of  ‎£1000 for the building of the hospital. 

At this time the Government also granted a site for the hospital. Four years later, on the 20th March 1846, the foundation stone of the Melbourne Hospital was laid by the Mayor of Melbourne James Palmer, on the corner of Lonsdale and Swanston Streets. However, despite the high standard of patient care achieved by the hospital, the actual buildings and facilities were inadequate, accommodation had reached a crisis point, and the building itself was condemned by a Royal Commission in 1892. The Commission recommended that the old site should be abandoned and a new hospital built at Parkville. In addition, since the establishment of the University of Melbourne in 1855, and particularly the Medical School in 1862, there had been constant calls for the hospital to be moved in closer proximity to the University.

In 1911-1912 the Melbourne Hospital was rebuilt on Lonsdale Street and the original hospital was demolished and renamed the Queen Victoria Hospital. In 1946 it became first women’s hospital in Victoria, operated for women by women. The Princess Mary Club opened on Lonsdale Street in 1926 and provided accommodation in the city for young women who would otherwise be unable to receive a tertiary education. It continued in this capacity until 1977 and is due to be demolished as of 2016, despite heritage listing for the Gothic-inspired building.

Biography:

Arthur Willmore (1814–1888)

Wilmore was born at Birmingham on 6 June 1814, brother of James Tibbitts Willmore, by whom he was trained. He became an engraver, excelling chiefly in landscape work. He was extensively employed and executed many plates for the ‘Art Journal’ from pictures by Collins, Cooke, Creswick, Rubens, Stanfield, Turner, Van Dyck, and others. His most important work was ‘The Return of the Lifeboat,’ after E. Duncan, engraved for the Art Union, 1878. Willmore frequently exhibited at the Royal Academy between 1858 and 1885. 

He died on 3 Nov. 1888.

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