C1822
 (1820)

A Representation of the March of the Guards towards Scotland in the Year 1745. To His Majesty the King of Prussia, an Encourager of Arts and Sciences!

“The March to Finchley”; scene at Tottenham Court (after the painting in the Foundling Museum) with soldiers gathering to march north to defend London from the Jacobite rebels; the crowd includes, in the foreground, a man urinating painfully against a … Read Full Description

$A 245

S/N: HOGA-074–223873
(LF25)
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Details

Full Title:

A Representation of the March of the Guards towards Scotland in the Year 1745. To His Majesty the King of Prussia, an Encourager of Arts and Sciences!

Date:

C1822
 (1820)

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Copper engraving.

Image Size: 

550mm 
x 430mm

Paper Size: 

645mm 
x 495mm
AUTHENTICITY
A Representation of the March of the Guards towards Scotland in the Year 1745. To His Majesty the King of Prussia, an Encourager of Arts and Sciences! - Antique Print from 1822

Genuine antique
dated:

1820

Description:

“The March to Finchley”; scene at Tottenham Court (after the painting in the Foundling Museum) with soldiers gathering to march north to defend London from the Jacobite rebels; the crowd includes, in the foreground, a man urinating painfully against a wall as he reads an advertisement for Dr Rock’s remedy for venereal disease, an innocent young piper, a drunken drummer, a young soldier with a pregnant ballad seller (her basket contains “God Save our Noble King” and a portrait of the Duke of Cumberland) and a Jacobite harridan selling newspapers, a milkmaid being kissed by one soldier while another fills his hat from her pail, a muffin man, a chimney boy, a gin-seller whose emaciated baby reaches for a drink; in the background a boxing match takes place under the sign of Giles Gardiner (Adam and Eve), a wagon loaded with equipment follows the marching soldiers and, to right, prostitutes lean from the windows of a brothel at the sign of Charles II’s head; beyond the sunlight shines on Hampstead village on the hill.

William Hogarth (1697 - 1794)

Hogarth was born in London, the son of an unsuccessful schoolmaster and writer from Westmoreland. After apprenticeship to a goldsmith, he began to produce his own engraved designs from 1710. He later took up oil painting, starting with small portrait groups called conversation pieces. He went on to create a series of paintings satirising contemporary customs, but based on earlier Italian prints, of which the first was ‘The Harlot’s Progress’ (1731), and perhaps the most famous ‘The Rake’s Progress’. His engravings were so plagiarised that he lobbied for the Copyright Act of 1735 as protection for writers and artists.

View other items by William Hogarth

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