C1815

A Sailor at a Quakers Funeral

A rare Irish issued satirical cartoon by the Dublin based publisher William McCleary based on the original British version by Isaac Cruikshank A Quaker stands by an open grave, with clasped hands, eyes sanctimoniously turned up. A grave-digger leans on his … Read Full Description

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S/N: CARIC-061–183683
(C120)
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Details

Full Title:

A Sailor at a Quakers Funeral

Date:

C1815

Condition:

Some minor holes and a small repaired tear at top paper edge. Laid onto blue backing paper.

Technique:

Etching with original hand colouring.

Image Size: 

335mm 
x 240mm
AUTHENTICITY
A Sailor at a Quakers Funeral - Antique Print from 1815

Genuine antique
dated:

1815

Description:

A rare Irish issued satirical cartoon by the Dublin based publisher William McCleary based on the original British version by Isaac Cruikshank

A Quaker stands by an open grave, with clasped hands, eyes sanctimoniously turned up. A grave-digger leans on his spade watching him with puzzled distaste. The Quaker: “Verily the spirit at length beginneth to move me – Alas! there is no happiness on this side of the grave.”  A disgruntled sailor, dressed with coat open to show a waistcoat stands opposite him asks: “Why then you Lubber, dont you come on this side?” A second Quaker stands behind the first, hands clasped, looking down; on the extreme left. a woman in a Quaker’s bonnet puts her handkerchief to her eyes. Behind the sailor and on the extreme right. is another mourner, also puzzled and unsympathetic. The scene is a large walled graveyard; a skull lies by the open grave, grinning up at the Quaker.


 

William McCleary (1799 - 1820)

McCleary was one of the major Irish publishers of mainly pirated copies of London satirical prints. He began trading from premises located at 31 Lower Ormond Quay in 1791 and by 1798 his business had become sufficiently successful to allow him to move to a larger shop located on Nassau Street. McCleary’s decision in copying the caricatures of his rival and fellow Dubliner J. Sidebotham and undercutting the prices of the pirated versions of Sidebotham's caricatures. resulted into a long lasting feud between the two publishers. His trading addresses: 31 & later 18 Lower Ormond Quay (1791-1798) 21 Nassau Street, Dublin (1799, 1820) 32 Nassau Street, Dublin (1808) 39 Nassau Street, Dublin (1820)

View other items by William McCleary

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