C1777
 (1798)

Chenopodium album. [Lamb Quarter's]

Artist:

William Curtis (1746 - 1799)

Very rare engraving from Curtis’ famous series, Flora Londinensis: or Plates and Descriptions of Such Plants as Grow Wild in the Environs of London. Common name: lamb’s quarters, melde, goosefoot and fat-hen It is extensively cultivated in Northern India as … Read Full Description

$A 145

S/N: FLOP-050-BOT-OS–229851
(C115)
Free Shipping

Within Australia

All orders ship free
within Australia

Rest of the World

Orders over A$300
ship free worldwide

See Shipping page for Terms & Conditions

Details

Full Title:

Chenopodium album. [Lamb Quarter’s]

Date:

C1777
 (1798)

Artist:

William Curtis (1746 - 1799)

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Copper engraving with original hand colouring

Image Size: 

225mm 
x 400mm

Paper Size: 

280mm 
x 475mm
AUTHENTICITY
Chenopodium album. [Lamb Quarter's] - Antique Print from 1777

Genuine antique
dated:

1798

Description:

Very rare engraving from Curtis’ famous series, Flora Londinensis: or Plates and Descriptions of Such Plants as Grow Wild in the Environs of London.

Common name: lamb’s quarters, melde, goosefoot and fat-hen

It is extensively cultivated in Northern India as a food crop.

Artist:

William Curtis (1746-1799)

Was an English botanist and entomologist, born at Alton, Hampshire. Curtis began as an apothecary, before turning his attention to botany and natural history. At the age of 25 he produced Instructions for collecting and preserving insects; particularly moths and butterflies. He established his own London Botanic Garden at Lambeth in 1779, moving to Brompton in 1789. His first published series was the highly regarded, Flora Londinensis, a pioneering work that devoted itself to urban nature within a short distance of London. Flora Londinensis was not a financial success but he went on to publish The Botanical Magazine that introduced exotic and familiar plants with appropiate information of the suitable growing conditions and soils for each plant.

Was an English botanist and entomologist, born at Alton, Hampshire. Curtis began as an apothecary, before turning his attention to botany and natural history. At the age of 25 he produced Instructions for collecting and preserving insects; particularly moths and butterflies. He established his own London Botanic Garden at Lambeth in 1779, moving to Brompton in 1789. His first published series was the highly regarded, Flora Londinensis, a pioneering work that devoted itself to urban nature within a short distance of London. Flora Londinensis was not a financial success but he went on to publish The Botanical Magazine that introduced exotic and familiar plants with appropriate information of the suitable growing conditions and soils for each plant.

Choose currency

Exchange rates are only indicative. All orders will be processed in Australian dollars. The actual amount charged may vary depending on the exchange rate and conversion fees applied by your credit card issuer.

Login

Register

Search

The List

Join our exclusive mailing list for first access to new acquisitions and special offers.