C1889

Edward Deas Thomson, C.B.

C.19th lithographed portrait of Sir Edward Deas Thomson KCMG, CB (1800 – 1879) was a Scotsman who became an administrator and politician in Australia, and was chancellor of the University of Sydney. Thomson then began working with his father who … Read Full Description

$A 50

S/N: AHONSW-POR-AA-024–224027
(DRW05)
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Details

Full Title:

Edward Deas Thomson, C.B.

Date:

C1889

Artist:

Unknown

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Lithograph with one tint

Image Size: 

160mm 
x 210mm
AUTHENTICITY
Edward Deas Thomson, C.B. - Antique Print from 1889

Genuine antique
dated:

1889

Description:

C.19th lithographed portrait of Sir Edward Deas Thomson KCMG, CB (1800 – 1879) was a Scotsman who became an administrator and politician in Australia, and was chancellor of the University of Sydney.

Thomson then began working with his father who at that time was reorganizing the system of keeping accounts in the navy. In 1826 Thomson visited the United States and Canada, and on his return in 1827 accepted the position of registrar of the orphan chambers at Demarara. Before leaving England he was able to arrange to exchange this position for that of clerk to the New South Wales legislative and executive councils. He arrived in Sydney in December 1828 and proved to be a valuable officer and was made Colonial Secretary at a salary of £1500 a year on  January 1837, a position he held for nearly 20 years. He entered the New South Wales Legislative Council and was vice-president of the executive council in the Parker ministry, and on 19 August 1857 moved for a select committee on the question of Australian federation. The committee reported in favour of a federal assembly being established but the Charles Cowper ministry had come into power in the meantime, and the question was shelved. Thomson continued to be a member of the legislative council until his death, but his health had suffered from his heavy work as colonial secretary and he no longer attempted to take a leading part in its proceedings. He had been granted a substantial pension on his retirement in 1856 and he now had time to devote himself to other interests. He had been an original member of the senate of the University of Sydney when it was founded in 1850, he became vice-chancellor in 1863, and was chancellor from 1865 until 1878. He took an interest in sporting matters and for some years was president of the Australian Jockey Club. He also served as President of the Australian Club in Sydney. During his visit to England he was appointed a Companion of the Order of the Bath (CB) and in 1874 he was created a Knight Commander of St Michael and St George.

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