C1837

Fals of Terni.[ Cascata delle Marmore]

Rare lithograph of Cascata delle Marmore, near the town of Terni, Umbria, Italy by the English artist, James Duffield Harding from Harding’s Sketches at Home and Abroad. The falls are the tallest man-made falls in the world which were created by the ancient … Read Full Description

$A 75

S/N: HSHA-007-EU-ITA–231051
(F34)
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Details

Full Title:

Fals of Terni.[ Cascata delle Marmore]

Date:

C1837

Condition:

Overall smudging.

Technique:

Lithograph printed with one tint.

Image Size: 

280mm 
x 390mm
AUTHENTICITY
Fals of Terni.[ Cascata delle Marmore] - Antique View from 1837

Genuine antique
dated:

1837

Description:

Rare lithograph of Cascata delle Marmore, near the town of Terni, Umbria, Italy by the English artist, James Duffield Harding from Harding’s Sketches at Home and Abroad. The falls are the tallest man-made falls in the world which were created by the ancient Romans.

This rare series of views were published by the great London lithographic firm of C. Hullmandel’s Lithographic Establishment.

References: Abbey Travel 29

History of the falls;

The Velino river flows through the highlands that surround the city of Rieti. In ancient times, it fed a wetland in the Rieti Valley that was thought to bring illness (probably malaria). To remove that threat to the city of Rieti, in 271 BC, the Roman consul Manius Curius Dentatus ordered the construction of a canal (the Curiano Trench) to divert the stagnant waters into the natural cliff at Marmore. From there, the water fell into the Nera river below. However, that solution created a different problem: when the Velino river was in flood stage, its water flowed through the Nera toward the city of Terni, threatening its population. The issue was so contentious between the two cities that the Roman Senate was forced to address it in 54 BC. Aulus Pompeius represented Terni, and Cicero represented Rieti. The Senate did nothing about the problem, and the problem remained the same for centuries.  Lack of maintenance in the canal resulted in a decrease in the flow, until eventually the wetland began to reappear. In 1422, Pope Gregory XII ordered the construction of a new canal to restore the original flow (the Gregorian Trench or Rieti Trench).  In 1545, Pope Paul III ordered that a new canal be built (the Pauline Trench). The plan was to expand the Curian Trench and to build a regulating valve to control the flow. Upon its completion some 50 years later (in 1598), Pope Clement VIII inaugurated the new work, and named it after himself: the Clementine Trench.  In the following two centuries, the presence of the canal was problematic for the countryside in the valley below, as the Nera often flooded it. In 1787, Pope Pius VI ordered architect Andrea Vici to modify the leaps below the falls, giving the falls its present look and finally resolving the majority of the problems.  In 1896, the newly formed steel mills in Terni began using the water flow in the Curiano Trench to power their operation. In the following years, engineers began using the water flow to generate electricity.

James Duffield Harding (1798 - 1863)

Harding was an English landscape painter, lithographer and author of drawing manuals. His use of tinted papers and opaque paints in watercolour proved influential.

View other items by James Duffield Harding

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