C1845

Kuganoskue

Artist:

Utagawa Hiroshige (1797 - 1858)

Zen Dai Sojo Gyoson -Former Major Archbishop Gyoson. Seeing the falling cherry blossums, and thinking of the past, he worries about the future he sees in the flowing water, Although flowers return to their roots, what can one do about … Read Full Description

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S/N: JWB-HIROSHIGE-THPC-066–216188
(C116)
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Details

Full Title:

Kuganoskue

Date:

C1845

Artist:

Utagawa Hiroshige (1797 - 1858)

Condition:

A small area of discolouration in kimono, otherwise in good condition.

Technique:

Wood block

Image Size: 

222mm 
x 343mm
AUTHENTICITY
Kuganoskue - Antique Print from 1845

Genuine antique
dated:

1845

Description:

Zen Dai Sojo Gyoson -Former Major Archbishop Gyoson.

Seeing the falling cherry blossums, and thinking of the past, he worries about the future he sees in the flowing water, Although flowers return to their roots, what can one do about the running water that never returns. Though not a deer that longs for his mate above the slower slopes. Mount Imo and Se are separated by a river – the magpies’ bridge interrupted-and standing on the banks of the Silver River of the Milky Way, are they not exactly like the two stars?.

Hiroshige shows Koganosuke standing on th ebanks of the Yoshino River, separated from his love and worrying about the future.

The woodblocks for this series were jointly designed by three artists Hiroshige and Kunisada and Kuniyoshi

Reference: Herwig & Mostow, The Hundred Poets Compared 2007, No. 66  p.166 ill. p.167

Biography:

Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858)

Hiroshige was born in Edo, his father held an official position in the firs brigade of the Edo Castle. He was drawing from an early age so his father arranged lessons for him from a fellow fireman, an amateur painter named Okajima Rinsai. In 1811 at the gae of fiteen, after the deathe of both his mother and father, he also tried to become a pupil of Toyokuni. Toyokuni’s studio was unable to accomodate another student so he became a student of Toyohiro of the same school. It is said that he made such quick progress in this studio that within a year Toyohiro introduced him as a member of the Utagawa School, and giving him the artist name Utagawa Hiroshige. Until 1830 he worked in the tradition of the Utagawa School, designing mainly bijin-ga (beautiful women), yakusha-e (actors) and musha-e (warrior) prints.

In the 1830’s Hiroshige embarked in a different direction in his work. Probably inspired by Hokusia’s Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji, he produced a number of landscape views which were immediately popular and established  Hiroshige’s enduring fame as a landscape artist. 

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