C1800

Portrait of an Irish Chief, Drawn from Life at Wexford. Erin go Brach.

Irish issue of James Gillray’s caricature relating to the Irish Rebellion of 1798 against British Rule. The Irishman, with coarse features and cropped hair, stands on a rounded hill, left arm raised oratorically, right hand on one of two pistols … Read Full Description

Sold

S/N: CARIC-077–183761
(C120)
Categories:
Free Shipping

Within Australia

All orders ship free
within Australia

Rest of the World

Orders over A$300
ship free worldwide

See Shipping page for Terms & Conditions

Details

Full Title:

Portrait of an Irish Chief, Drawn from Life at Wexford. Erin go Brach.

Date:

C1800

Artist:

Unknown

Condition:

Some minor discolouration, sepia inscription ‘Brion McGuire’ in an early hand below the caption, otherwise in good condition. Laid onto blue backing paper.

Technique:

Etching with original hand colouring.

Image Size: 

255mm 
x 360mm
AUTHENTICITY
Portrait of an Irish Chief, Drawn from Life at Wexford. Erin go Brach. - Antique Print from 1800

Genuine antique
dated:

1800

Description:

Irish issue of James Gillray’s caricature relating to the Irish Rebellion of 1798 against British Rule.

The Irishman, with coarse features and cropped hair, stands on a rounded hill, left arm raised oratorically, right hand on one of two pistols in his belt, saying, Erin go Brack!” He wears a round hat tilted to one side, and with a small tuft or plume, a double-breasted coat with the skirts looped up, pantaloons and half-boots, a long sabre. He looks to the left On the plain beneath (right), across which run tiny fugitives, are burning buildings and clouds of smoke. 

Gillrays version was issued on 10 July 1798, London and the caption within the caricature included the words; “No Union.Erin go Brack!”

He is said to be Grattan (at this time in England), but there is no resemblance to his portraits, or to other representations of him by Gillray. He refused to join the United Irishmen, but on the groundless charge of an informer of being a sworn member of that body he was struck off the Irish privy council on 6 Oct. 1798. The portrait is more probably a generalized one of a typical Irish insurgent in 1798, in the  War in Wexford and the description of the Wexford men. Among their varied banners was a flag with an Irish harp surmounted by a cap of Liberty and the motto ‘Erin go bragh’.

Erin go Bragh and was used to express allegiance to Ireland. The phrase was supposed to have been first used during the Irish Rebellion of 1798. It was on a flag brandished by the United Irishmen to voice a rallying cry for Irish independence from Britain.

Collections: 
British Museum: BM Satires 9236 (Gillray edition)

Choose currency

Exchange rates are only indicative. All orders will be processed in Australian dollars. The actual amount charged may vary depending on the exchange rate and conversion fees applied by your credit card issuer.

Login

Register

Search

The List

Join our exclusive mailing list for first access to new acquisitions and special offers.