C1773
 (1982)

Rapanea Urceolata (R. Brown) Mez in Engler / Gouanoides glaberrima / Endeavour River, Australia / 17 June-4 August 1770

Fabulous stipple engraving from Banks Floreligium. Plate 200, from set 31 of 100. In 1980, the British printing firm Alecto Historical Editions took up the task of finally printing the 743 line engravings originally created between 1772 and 1784. A … Read Full Description

$A 650

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S/N: BFLO-200-AA–394583
(FLR)
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Details

Full Title:

Rapanea Urceolata (R. Brown) Mez in Engler / Gouanoides glaberrima / Endeavour River, Australia / 17 June-4 August 1770

Date:

C1773
 (1982)

Engraver:

 

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Stipple engraving coloured a la poupee and hand finished

Image Size: 

250mm 
x 370mm

Paper Size: 

555mm 
x 715mm

Platemark Size: 

297mm 
x 460mm
AUTHENTICITY
Rapanea Urceolata (R. Brown) Mez in Engler / Gouanoides glaberrima / Endeavour River, Australia / 17 June-4 August 1770 - Antique Print from 1773

Genuine antique
dated:

1982

Description:

Fabulous stipple engraving from Banks Floreligium. Plate 200, from set 31 of 100.

In 1980, the British printing firm Alecto Historical Editions took up the task of finally printing the 743 line engravings originally created between 1772 and 1784. A limited edition of 100 full sets, entitled Banks’ Florilegium, were printed in full colour, directly from the original plates held by the British Museum. The project took 10 years to complete. The plates were printed on an Albion hand roller press. Up to 15 colours were inked by hand onto every copperplate for each print pulled. Each plate is numbered in pencil with the set number.

The work involved producing 83,959 perfect impressions. The soft copper of the plates meant a larger print run was difficult. 

The vegetable hummingbird, agati in Tamil and Agase in Kannada or hummingbird tree is native to the Northern Territory and Southeast Asia. The flowers of S. grandiflora are eaten as a vegetable in Southeast Asia, including Laos, Thailand, Java and Lombok in Indonesia, Vietnam, and Sri Lanka. 

Sydney Parkinson (1745-1770) artist on Cooks 1st Voyage of in the Endeavour, which sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of Venus and charted the Pacific islands, New Zealand and Australia. Published by Alecto Historical Editions in association with the British Museum (Natural History).

Collections:
National Museum of Australia: 

James Cook (1728 - 1779)

Cook was the most important navigator of the Age of Enlightenment, a period that saw the mystery of the Southland resolved, the discovery of New Zealand, Hawaii, numerous Pacific Islands and confirmation that a Northwest Passage did not exist. Cook was born in Yorkshire, England, the son of a Scottish labourer and apprenticeship for three years under John Walker, a Quaker coal-shipper of Whitby. In 1755 Walker offered him a command, but instead Cook joined HMS Eagle and within a month was master's mate. After two years on the Channel service, he was promoted master of the Pembroke, and in 1758 crossed the Atlantic in her and took part in the siege of Louisburg and the survey of the St Lawrence River that led to the capture of Quebec. Returning to England in 1762 he married Elizabeth Batts (1742-1832?) of Shadwell, whom he was to rarely see in the ensuing years at sea. Cook then famously commanded three voyages that ended with his death on the island of Hawaii on 14 February 1779.

View other items by James Cook

Sydney Parkinson (1745 - 1771)

Sydney Parkinson (17451771) Parkinson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland and from an early age his artistic abilities were noticed. He was employed by Joseph Banks in London before joining him and Daniel Solander on James Cook’s Endeavour on a circumnavigation of the globe (1768-1771) as a botanical draughtsman. During the voyage, he made at least 1,300 drawings and paintings. Parkinson was the first European to draw eucalypts. On the return voyage, he died in Batavia.

View other items by Sydney Parkinson

Frederick Polydore Nodder (1751 - 1800)

Nodder was an English natural history artist of plants, animals and fauna. He was botanical artist to Queen Charlotte and also worked for Joseph Banks on the monumental publication of the botanical specimens collected on James Cook's first voyage. Known as Banks' Florilegium, it was never printed during Bank's lifetime.

View other items by Frederick Polydore Nodder

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