C1850

Rome MDCCCXLIX [1849]

Artist:

G. Thomas

Spectacular panorama of the Eternal City taken from the vantage point of the Janiculum Hill. The panorama is often incorrectly attributed to John Little who was one of the original owners of the Illustrated London News and not an artist. … Read Full Description

$A 975

S/N: ILN-EU-ITA-500504-SUPP–232283
(MD 10)
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Details

Full Title:

Rome MDCCCXLIX [1849]

Date:

C1850

Artist:

G. Thomas

Engraver:

Walter George Mason 
(1820 – 
1866)

Condition:

Minor spotting at top right corner of image, otherwise in good condition, with folds as issued. Laid on archival linen.

Technique:

Hand coloured engraving.

Image Size: 

975mm 
x 350mm

Paper Size: 

1050mm 
x 452mm
AUTHENTICITY
Rome MDCCCXLIX [1849] - Antique Print from 1850

Genuine antique
dated:

1850

Description:

Spectacular panorama of the Eternal City taken from the vantage point of the Janiculum Hill.

The panorama is often incorrectly attributed to John Little who was one of the original owners of the Illustrated London News and not an artist. The artist was G. Thomas and the engraver was Walter George Mason who emigrated to Australia soon after engraving the panorama.

In common with many eighteenth and nineteenth-century visitors to Rome, many artists depicted the city from the panoramic views seen from certain elevated vantage points. One of the most famous of these was the Janiculum Hill (or Gianicolo), a ridge of high ground to the west of the River Tiber which offers sweeping vistas across the historical centre of the capital. The most famous vantage points were from San Pietro in Montorio, the Villa Lante, or the oak of Torquato Tasso

Sold with the very rare key.

Biography:

Walter George Mason (1820-1866)

Mason was born in London, the second son of Abraham John Mason, a well-known wood engraver and lecturer. Walter’s father began teaching him the art of wood-engraving when the family lived in New York in the 1830’s. Walter was sent back to London to train under Mr G. Bonner before 1839. 
In England, Walter Mason became very well known as a wood engraver and worked with The Illustrated London News, Punch, Pictorial Times, The Art Journal,and other periodicals.

Walter’s brothers, George and Charles, had immigrated to Australia in about 1850 and worked in Sydney as wood engravers.It seems likely that they encouraged Walter to join them. In 1852 Walter and his family left England for Australia, arriving in Sydney via the Windsor on 4 November 1852. Soon after his arrival in Sydney, Mason became involved in the founding of The Illustrated Sydney News.
Despite a small permanent staff and the fact that 4000 copies of the first issue were sold at sixpence a copy, the paper had financial problems from the beginning. Over a few months in 1854, five of the original proprietors left the partnership and Walter Mason became printer and publisher.

Despite engraving illustrations for a large number of newspapers, books and magazines, Walter was in financial difficulties for most of his time in Sydney. 

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