C1882

The Eight-Hours' Celebration.

The Eight Hours League campaigned for an eight hour day on the basis of eight hours work, eight hours for rest, and eight hours for recreation and education. Their slogan was, “8 Hours labor” “8 hours recreation” “8 hours rest”

$A 175

S/N: AS-AA-820605132–221213
(B010)
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Details

Full Title:

The Eight-Hours’ Celebration.

Date:

C1882

Condition:

In good condition.

Technique:

Hand coloured engraving.

Image Size: 

235mm 
x 335mm
AUTHENTICITY
The Eight-Hours' Celebration. - Antique Print from 1882

Genuine antique
dated:

1882

Description:

The Eight Hours League campaigned for an eight hour day on the basis of eight hours work, eight hours for rest, and eight hours for recreation and education. Their slogan was, “8 Hours labor” “8 hours recreation” “8 hours rest”

D.A.P. - Alfred James Daplyn (1844 - 1926)

Daplyn was an artist born in London. He studied at the Slade School, the National Academy in New York, under Leon Gérôme at L'Ecole Nationale des Beaux Arts in Paris and in Rome. He also studied under Carolus-Duran and Corot, and sought inspiration at artist colonies in Pont-Aven and Barbizon in France; some of his work was exhibited at the Old Salon, London. He migrated to Melbourne in 1881 and next year exhibited his 'Showery Weather' and 'The Boat-Builder' at the Victorian Academy of Arts; according to the Argus, 25 March 1882, he 'painted in the low tones after the French method, and in the style of the “impressionists”', possibly the first use of the word in an Australian context. Daplyn moved to Sydney in 1884, became secretary of the New South Wales Art Society and its instructor in painting in 1885-92. Among the artists he influenced were Charles Conder, Sydney Long and perhaps most of all, Julian Ashton, with whom he often painted on the Hawkesbury River. About 1892 he visited at Vailima his old friend, Robert Louis Stevenson, whom he had met in his student days in France, and painted for nearly a year in Samoa. He then returned to Sydney and set up as an art expert, giving lessons and making illustrations. In 1902 he published Landscape Painting from Nature in Australia, a manual for the student in oil and water colours. In 1913 a substantial legacy took him to Paris and London; after World War I he made a sketching tour in Belgium. By 1920 he was back in Sydney; in 1924 he returned to England. Aged 82 he died at Chelsea on 19 July 1926. He left his 'paintings, pictures and books' to the artist William Lister Lister.

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