C1822
 (1820)

The Man of Taste.

Artist:

William Hogarth (1697 - 1794)

The circumstance on which this severe satire against the irritable Bard of Twickenham was built, is thus described by Dr. Johnson: “Mr. Pope published, in 1731, a Poem, called ‘False Taste,’ in which he very particularly and severely criticises the … Read Full Description

$A 110

S/N: HOGA-134–195836
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Details

Full Title:

The Man of Taste.

Date:

C1822
 (1820)

Artist:

William Hogarth (1697 - 1794)

Condition:

Small mark at centre right otherwise in good condition.

Technique:

Copper engraving.
AUTHENTICITY
The Man of Taste. - Antique Print from 1822

Genuine antique
dated:

1820

Description:

The circumstance on which this severe satire against the irritable Bard
of Twickenham was built, is thus described by Dr. Johnson: “Mr.
Pope published, in 1731, a Poem, called ‘False Taste,’ in which he very
particularly and severely criticises the house, the furniture, the
gardens, and the entertainments of Timon, a man of great wealth and
little taste.

Hogarth made this design, which presents a view of Burlington gate. On
the front, as a crooked compliment to the Noble Proprietor, he has
inscribed the word Taste; and, as a standing proof of the
Projector being entitled to the application, placed a statue of his
grand favourite William Kent, triumphantly brandishing his palette and
pencils on the summit, with two reclining figures, representing Raphael
and Michael Angelo, for his supporters. Standing on a scaffold-board
beneath them, Mr. Pope, in the character of a Plasterer, is
white-washing the front, and whirling his brush with a spirit that
produces a shower of liquid pearl, which dismays and defiles the
passengers beneath : the principal of these, intended for the Duke of
Chandos, holds his hat over his head, to shelter himself in his retreat.
The torrent is not confined to his Grace’s person, but lavishly
scattered over his carriage and attendants, among whom is a Blackamoor
in the way of being white-washed.

The works of William Hogarth from the original plates restored by
James Heath : with the addition of many subjects not before collected,
to which are prefixed a biographical essay on the genius and productions
of Hogarth, and explanations of the subjects of the plates, by John
Nichols.

Biography:

William Hogarth (1697-1794)

Hogarth was born in
London, the son of an unsuccessful schoolmaster and writer from
Westmoreland. After apprenticeship to a goldsmith, he began to produce
his own engraved designs from 1710. He later took up oil painting,
starting with small portrait groups called conversation pieces. He went
on to create a series of paintings satirising contemporary customs, but
based on earlier Italian prints, of which the first was ‘The Harlot’s
Progress’ (1731), and perhaps the most famous ‘The Rake’s Progress’. His
engravings were so plagiarised that he lobbied for the Copyright Act of
1735 as protection for writers and artists.

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